Category Archives: Uncategorized

Frey Freyday – Criticism

(Frey Freyday is simply a bunch of inspirational, motivational and other quotes meant to make you think, reflect, smile, even laugh a bit. Hopefully helpful, useful stuff….)

 “It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.” Teddy Roosevelt

At the end of the day, at the end of my life, I want to be able to say that I contributed more than I criticized. – Brene Brown

 WORD TO LIVE BY:

  1. Criticism –
    the analysis and judgement of the merits and faults of a literary or artistic work.

 A few thoughts on criticism. If you don’t like them, please don’t criticize me.

  • There is constructive criticism, when done correctly with a helpful suggestion attached to it, it can be very helpful if done in a thoughtful, loving way; “When you do X, it comes across as this, did you ever consider doing Y instead because it may work better….”. It is easy and less helpful to criticize without a suggestion or alternative.
  • A psychologist/pastor that I respect a lot once told me that often, not always, people criticize because they have a poor self-image or they feel inadequate themselves, that the criticism is a form of projection, in some cases.
  • Unless someone has actually done it, or been in your shoes, or been brave as you are in whatever it is you’re doing, they really don’t have a right to criticize.
  • It is easier to criticize than create.

 Parting thoughts:

  • Dare to risk criticism. Be bold. You may fail. People may say things. Guess what, you were brave and grew from the experience. You’re better for it.
  • If I can provide some constructive criticism? Stop reading this and go have a good weekend.

Frey Freyday was actually born out of something I created called “Words To Live By” (WTLB). Going forward, I will now not only share the quotes, as you may be used to receiving, but also a related (WTLB). In 1999, when we had our first daughter, I was contemplating how I would raise my new beautiful child, and I was thinking about how I can best educate her and my other children about values, morals, and other key thoughts about life. School offers education. Religion offers some values and morals. Parents offer most of it, sometimes intentionally, sometimes accidentally.

So I created a (WTLB) book, like a dictionary, which lists things like honesty, love, persistence, etc. with a definition that I created, with my wife’s input. I then turned it into a workbook with one word per page and space below for notes. For years we would discuss with my two daughters and they would draw pictures and make notes in the blank space. I may share some of those images with you. As they got older, they were less inclined to draw and more open to quotes and references from adults, hence where Frey Freyday came from….

You can read more at www.onewebstrategy.com

Frey Freyday – a few quick thoughts

These are different and uncertain times for all of us.

Here are a few quick thoughts;

Gratitude; life certainly isn’t perfect right now but I believe we must be grateful for our jobs and for our health.

Gratitude is riches. Complaint is poverty. Doris Day

Compassion; we should consider having compassion for our clients, the business owners, for our communities, for our co-workers and for our loved ones. We are here to serve and help others during this time.

The greatness of a man is measured by the way he treats his fellow man. Myles Munroe

Meaning; we can always choose what something means…- we can choose the meaning we take away from a moment or situation.

Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of human freedoms – to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way. Viktor E. Frankl

Humor; we all must search for levity, for humor in each moment, to relax and to put things into perspective.

Humor is just another defense against the universe. Mel Brooks

Best of health to you all….

Frey Freyday – Unconditional Love

(Frey Freyday is simply a bunch of inspirational, motivational and other quotes meant to make you think, reflect, smile, even laugh a bit. Hopefully helpful, useful stuff….)

Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another.”

WORD TO LIVE BY:

Unconditional love is known as affection without any limitations, or love without conditions. This term is sometimes associated with other terms such as true altruism or complete love.

On this specific day and during these unusual times, I think it is valuable to consider and ponder on this definition.

The ideal of unconditional love is a noble one. We want to be loved as we are, and perhaps we’d like to see ourselves as capable of selfless love.

I think being the imperfect human beings that we are, it is sometimes very hard to love unconditionally, but it is something that we must strive for, nonetheless.

Frey Freyday was actually born out of something I created called “Words To Live By” (WTLB). Going forward, I will now not only share the quotes, as you may be used to receiving, but also a related (WTLB). In 1999, when we had our first daughter, I was contemplating how I would raise my new beautiful child, and I was thinking about how I can best educate her and my other children about values, morals, and other key thoughts about life. School offers education. Religion offers some values and morals. Parents offer most of it, sometimes intentionally, sometimes accidentally.

So I created a (WTLB) book, like a dictionary, which lists things like honesty, love, persistence, etc. with a definition that I created, with my wife’s input. I then turned it into a workbook with one word per page and space below for notes. For years we would discuss with my two daughters and they would draw pictures and make notes in the blank space. I may share some of those images with you. As they got older, they were less inclined to draw and more open to quotes and references from adults, hence where Frey Freyday came from….

You can read more at www.onewebstrategy.com

How to delay your credit card payment during the coronavirus pandemic

How to delay your credit card payment during the coronavirus pandemic

If the coronavirus pandemic has you struggling to make credit card payments, it may be time to consider these options on how you can delay paying your bill with minimal drawbacks.

Alexandria White

The ongoing coronavirus pandemic has many Americans out of work and struggling to pay bills, which may include hefty credit card debt. Prior to the current economic turmoil, credit card debt hit a record high of $930 billion for Americans in the final quarter of 2019 — and chances are likely that 2020 will top that number.

If you’re one of the thousands of Americans laid off, furloughed or facing reduced working hours, you may find it hard to make credit card payments. Thankfully, credit card issuers are offering various relief programs, which may include waiving interest and fees or providing the ability to skip payments.

Below, CNBC Select reviews how you can delay making your credit card payment, while minimizing the potential negative effect on your credit score.

How to delay your credit card payment

  1. Call your credit card issuer
  2. Explain how you’re negatively affected by the coronavirus
  3. Ask for assistance
  4. Confirm the terms of your relief program
  5. Take note of any effect to your credit score

If you’re finding it hard to make credit card payments, the best thing you can do is speak to a customer service representative to review potential relief plans. Here is a step-by-step guide on what to do to get assistance.

1. Call your credit card issuer

In order to discuss assistance options, you’ll need to pick up the phone and speak to a customer service representative. Chat options are not as effective in getting help. You can call the number on the back of your credit card to contact a rep or check if your card issuer has a dedicated coronavirus line.

Here is more information on contacting the main card issuers: American ExpressAppleBank of AmericaCapital OneChaseCiti and Discover.

2. Explain how you’re negatively affected by the coronavirus

Once you reach a rep, make sure you discuss any financial concerns that may apply, including:

  • A recent layoff, furlough or reduction in working hours by you or your significant other
  • Concerns that your job or your significant other’s job may be at risk

Any of these events can drastically reduce your income and impact your ability to pay credit card bills on time. It’s a good idea to factor in the impact of your significant other’s income, since you likely have shared expenses and/or joint accounts.

3. Ask for assistance

After explaining your situation, the rep will be able to discuss any available relief options that can assist your financial burden during this time. That may include late fee waivers, lower interest rates and the ability to temporarily skip payments without interest charges.

Keep in mind, the exact coverage you receive depends on your individual situation and what assistance your card issuer is offering. Some issuers are clear on the relief they offer, while others are vague and encourage customers to simply call and discuss options.

Learn more about what credit card issuers are offering as customer assistance.

4. Confirm the terms of your relief program

Once you receive assistance, confirm the exact terms of the program. You’ll want to know how long the relief lasts and if any fees are associated with it.

For instance, some card issuers, like Citi, are offering forbearance, which typically allows you to pause minimum payments. But you should verify if you’ll incur any interest on skipped payments and how long you can put payments on hold for. If you have the Citi® Double Cash Card and receive an offer to pause monthly payments, make sure you know whether any interest will accrue during the forbearance period and the relief end date.

5. Take note of any effect to your credit score

If you enroll in a credit card forbearance program, your account may continue to accrue interest, but your lender won’t report the late payments to the credit bureaus (Experian, Equifax and TransUnion). This means there won’t be a negative effect to your credit score because of missed payments for the time you are in forbearance.

However, it’s also key to know that pausing payments and racking up additional interest and credit card debt causes your utilization rate (which is the percentage of your total credit you’re using) to increase. This can have a negative impact on your credit score, so try and pay of any balances as soon as possible.

Keep in mind that you have to opt-in to a forbearance program. If you simply skip payments without speaking to your card issuer, your credit score will be hurt.

Last — you can request that your lender includes a statement on your account that indicates you have been ‘affected by a natural or declared disaster,’ which Experian states can help protect your credit history and credit scores.

From

https://www.cnbc.com/select/how-to-delay-your-credit-card-payment/

brain changing benefits of exercise

A great TED Talk, especially now:

What’s the most transformative thing that you can do for your brain today? Exercise! says neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki. Get inspired to go to the gym as Suzuki discusses the science of how working out boosts your mood and memory — and protects your brain against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s

TED TALK – Wendy Suzuki – “The Brain-changing benefits of exercise”

 

Frey Freyday – Perseverance

(Frey Freyday is simply a bunch of inspirational, motivational and other quotes meant to make you think, reflect, smile, even laugh a bit. Hopefully helpful, useful stuff….)

 Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and above all confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something and that this thing must be attained. Marie Curie

Word to Live By:

perseverance-[ˌpərsəˈvirəns] NOUN -persistence in doing something despite difficulty or delay in achieving success.

 So these are very unusual times, right?

We can complain, we can get upset. We can make other choices too.

We must persevere. We must continue, improve, do better, make it work, ask for help, offer help, make an effort, have faith and keep going.

Just keep swimming…..

Many years ago I was in a job that I didn’t like with a person who was hostile and difficult. Finances were tight. I wanted out of that job. I was often concerned and depressed. For about 1 or 2 weeks, I just coasted. I didn’t really work hard and I ‘vegged out’. Then I spoke with a few older, wiser guys and they both told me to ‘keep swinging’. They were right. I went back and put forth 100% effort, worked hard, regardless of the circumstances. It was at that time that I started to look for quotes, like the above quote. I shared them with a few people and they liked it. So I routinely sent out what I then called, “Simple Stuff” – a prelude to the Frey Freyday. This kept my mind focused and more upbeat. Soon the upbeat attitude and full effort actually got me a better job. It also built a habit of putting forth 100% effort and looking for inspiration and ‘good stuff’ in the world.

Perseverance is passion and perseverance for very long-term goals. Perseverance is having stamina. Perseverance is sticking with your future, day in, day out, not just for the week, not just for the month, but for years, and working really hard to make that future a reality. Perseverance is living life like it’s a marathon, not a sprint.

The uncertainty we face now is tough for some. For some there is certainty that things will indeed get harder, at least in the short term. Should we go quietly into that good night? No. Give it your best 100% effort, look for good, and give value to others.


Frankly, in general, I am encouraged by what I see in the U.S. – People are being kind, people are making it work, they are trying to stay upbeat, stay healthy and trying to keep moving ahead.

We are persevering together!

“Trust the wait. Embrace the uncertainty. Enjoy the beauty of becoming.                             When nothing is certain, anything is possible”      – Mandy Hale

Frey Freyday was actually born out of something I created called “Words To Live By” (WTLB). Going forward, I will now not only share the quotes, as you may be used to receiving, but also a related (WTLB). In 1999, when we had our first daughter, I was contemplating how I would raise my new beautiful child, and I was thinking about how I can best educate her and my other children about values, morals, and other key thoughts about life. School offers education. Religion offers some values and morals. Parents offer most of it, sometimes intentionally, sometimes accidentally.

So I created a (WTLB) book, like a dictionary, which lists things like honesty, love, persistence, etc. with a definition that I created, with my wife’s input. I then turned it into a workbook with one word per page and space below for notes. For years we would discuss with my two daughters and they would draw pictures and make notes in the blank space. I may share some of those images with you. As they got older, they were less inclined to draw and more open to quotes and references from adults, hence where Frey Freyday came from….

You can read more at www.onewebstrategy.com

See the source image

Trillion – what is it?

So, at this moment, many Americans are waiting to see if Congress can come through with a stimulus package; it is rumored to be up to, perhaps over, $2 trillion dollars.

What is that number, trillion? What does that mean?

1,000,000,000,000 (12 zeroes, 4 commas)
or 1012 (ten to the twelfth power)
a number equal to 1,000 times one billion
one thousand billion

How Long Ago Is a Trillion Seconds?

If you count backward, then:
1 million seconds = 12 days ago
1 billion seconds = 31 years ago
1 trillion seconds = 30,000 B.C.

How high is a trillion in $1000 bills?

If you stack a trillion-worth of $1000 bills together, then:
1 million dollars = 4 inches high
1 billion dollars = 364 feet high
1 trillion dollars = 63 miles high
(give or take a foot or two)
Note that this is a STACK, not laid end-to-end.

Let’s Measure a Trillion in Money

With about 305,000,000 people and 111,000,000 households in the U.S.

$1 Million is 1¢ per household,
$1 Billion is $3.28 per person and $9 per household,
$1 Trillion is $3,280 per person and $9,000 per household

If a person’s salary is $40,000 per year it would take:

25 years to earn $1 Million
25 Thousand years to earn $1 Billion,
25 Million years to earn $1 Trillion

 If you lived to be 80 years of age, to have:

$1 Million you would have to save $34 each day of your life,
$1 Billion you would have to save $34,000 each day of your life,
$1 Trillion you would have to save $34 Million each day of your life

One year of clock time = (60sec/min) x (60 min/hr) x (24 hr/da) x (365.25 da) = 3.16 x 107 sec

One trillion seconds of ordinary clock time = ( 1012 sec)/( 3.16 x 107 sec/yr) = 31,546 years!

Six trillion seconds equals 189,276 years. Now, as an aside, along with the nearly six trillion miles in the light-year, you might be interested to know that there are nearly five trillion dollars in the current U.S. national debt. Is it any wonder that our politicians in Washington are concerned?

(An interesting bit of trivia: If one were to count the national Debt at the rate of one dollar per second, he or she would have to use a mechanical counter to click off the digits. Why? Because, if he or she counted in the usual way, saying “one, two, three, …” etc., there would be numbers whose names are so large, that it would take more than a second of clock time to pronounce them. For example: “Nine hundred and ninety nine billion, nine hundred and ninety nine million, nine hundred and ninety nine thousand, nine hundred and ninety nine,” takes about 8 seconds to pronounce.)

How much is a trillion dollars?

Fear vs. Reality – Coronavirus

A must read from Peter Diamandis about the facts around the Coronavirus.

Over the past week, our amygdalas (the fear centers of our brain) have been in overdrive.

As Coronavirus (and anxiety) spread, I’m concerned by the level of pandemic fear circulating through our news and social media.

The goal of this blog is to give you a thoughtful alternative to fear… to contextualize what you are hearing…

Let’s talk about death rates… While this is no apples-to-apples comparison, how we react to death is primal. And when we hear about Coronavirus-induced deaths, we go on red alert. But allow me to contextualize the numbers for you.

(Disclaimer: The below compared populations are different (China vs. world), and infectious diseases do not maintain a consistent daily average. But the point still stands…)

On one of the worst days for Coronavirus in China (February 10, 2020), 108 people died. But on a given day, globally:

  • 26,283 people die of cancer;
  • 49,041 people die of cardiovascular diseases;
  • 4,383 people die of diabetes.

Meanwhile, suicide takes on average 2,191 lives….

Mosquitoes take the lives of over 2,740 people, and….

And HUMANS kill an average of 1,287 fellow people, every single day.

In response, this blog covers two key takeaways:

(1) The hard numbers to help you decide: Should I travel? Do I overstock my pantry? And is the world coming to an end? Let’s look at the data on how Coronavirus compares to typical influenza (the “flu”). (SPOILER ALERT: we’re seeing over 1000X more deaths from the regular flu, as of early March.)

(2) A brilliant blog on the realities of Coronavirus by Dr. Paul Sax, a Harvard Medical School classmate of mine (now Professor at our mutual alma mater), who serves as clinical director of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. His blog is brilliant. Read it. Share it.

Let’s dive in.

Part 1: The Numbers… Let’s look at the data

COVID-19 has come out of left field and left us blindsided.

But people are largely fearful because we don’t understand it.

So let’s look first at the numbers.

During the 2017-2018 flu season, CDC figures put U.S. influenza deaths at roughly 80,000. Meanwhile, global estimates indicated anywhere between 290,000 – 650,000 influenza-associated deaths from respiratory causes alone.

And in terms of deaths from influenza-induced lower respiratory tract infections, a 2019 study estimated 99,000 – 200,000 deaths for the 2017-2018 flu season.

The following year, CDC figures estimated 35.5 million Americans fell ill with influenza, resulting in 490,600 hospitalizations and 34,200 deaths.

And since this past October, the regular influenza has infected as many as 49 million and killed between 20,000 – 52,000 in the U.S. alone.

By comparison on a global scale, the Coronavirus outbreak has infected over 90,000 people as of early March, resulting in 3,462 deaths worldwide (today’s stat).

While the fatality rate of Coronavirus now appears to be slightly higher than that of typical influenza (estimates range from 1.4% to the WHO’s 3.4%), the toll of the common flu is staggeringly higher than that of COVID-19.

Concern—as with any infectious disease—is warranted, yes.

But knowing the numbers helps limit our fear of the unknown, and battle our amygdalas against irrationality.

These figures are not to suggest we should live without precaution. Regardless of how willing you are to sacrifice enjoyment for safety, it’s critical to understand expert concerns and how to mitigate them.

How much risk are you willing to take? What are you willing to sacrifice in everyday enjoyment and carefree living? And should you really be hoarding toilet paper?

This is the blog that I have shared with my family and friends and hope it is useful to you:

Part 2: Infectious Disease Doctor: What Does (And Doesn’t) Scare Me About The Coronavirus

By Dr. Paul Sax, Harvard Medical School

Being a specialist in infectious diseases right now is an interesting experience.

Added to the usual challenges of our everyday practice — caring for people receiving transplants or chemotherapy, those with HIV, surgical infections, tropical diseases and others — we now must manage a deluge of coronavirus-related questions from friends, family and colleagues.

Here are a few recent examples in bold, along with my responses.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: My baby has a pediatrician’s appointment next week, and the doctor’s office is right next to the hospital. Is it safe to go?

A: Yes.

Q: Should I wear a mask while commuting to work on the T or other public transit?

A: Only if you’re sick yourself, because the mask will protect others. Otherwise masks probably don’t do anything to protect you. Here’s what you should do: Wash your hands!

Q: I’ve had a trip planned for a year to Australia and New Zealand and am supposed to leave in early April — should I cancel now and get a partial refund?

A: Only cancel if the anxiety of going would make you not enjoy the trip.

Q: I’m just back from France and have a bad cough, sore throat and a chill. How do I know if it’s the flu or coronavirus?

A: We really can’t tell. Reach out to your doctor and see about getting tested for both.

Q: Should I avoid Corona beer?

A: There’s no coronavirus-linked reason to pass on Corona beer — but in my opinion, it’s not very tasty.

OK, so my friends, family and colleagues haven’t really asked about that last one — but it is a thing.

Now, there was one actual question that caught me off guard: “What are you afraid of?”

Before responding, let me acknowledge that I am by nature an optimistic person — my family even gave me a T-shirt with the words “half full.”

Plus, we infectious diseases specialists are, by our very training and clinical activities, repeatedly handling situations that would make others uncomfortable — such as treating patients with anthrax, SARS, MERS, West Nile, H1N1 influenza, Zika and Ebola in the last 20 years alone.

But several aspects of this incipient pandemic cause me great concern.

5 Big Concerns

(1) Our health care system does not have “surge” capacity. This is especially true during flu season, when many hospitals run at nearly full capacity. Adding a high volume of patients with respiratory infections — all of whom would require private rooms — will severely strain most institutions. It will further block other important hospital activities, such as elective surgeries and transfers from other hospitals. This is already happening in northern Italy.

(2) Here in the U.S., testing for the new coronavirus was initially sharply limited. For a variety of reasons — misguided policy, regulatory limitations and faulty tests — we only recently started broad testing for coronavirus among people with compatible symptoms — some two months after the disease was first reported. (Initially, only those who had traveled to regions with coronavirus outbreaks were eligible for testing.) While other countries have already conducted thousands or even tens of thousands of tests, as of last week the U.S. had done fewer than 500. While the logjam on testing should end soon, it’s probably too late to prevent extensive community transmission.

(3) The people at greatest risk for severe or fatal coronavirus illness are already our most vulnerable patients. Like other viral respiratory tract infections — flu, respiratory syncytial virus, even rhinovirus (cause of the common cold) — older age and concurrent medical problems make coronavirus infection much more serious. Estimates from China suggest the mortality rate among those older than 80 is 15%. That’s why the reported identification of cases in a Washington nursing home is particularly worrisome.

(4) Hoarding of masks and other protective equipment could stress the supply chain, putting health care workers at risk. All of us in health care accept that exposure to infection is part of our job. But to do so without the appropriate protective supplies cannot be permitted. It is critical that we have access to the specialized N95 masks and other gear, especially during procedures that increase the risk of exposure.

(5) Political pressures might make it difficult for public health officials to tell the truth. Does Dr. Anthony Fauci — longtime director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and someone who has navigated outbreaks for decades — really need to have his statements cleared by Vice President Mike Pence? When Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, said a global pandemic was highly likely, only to be contradicted later that day by the president, who should we believe? The Trump administration on Saturday denied muzzling public health officials, but I find these examples troubling.

3 Important Reasons For Optimism

If that list seems like a lot to worry about, let me mention a few things I’m not worried about — and that even give me hope.

(1) We know the disease is mild in most people who get it. At least 80%, most likely more, won’t have an illness bad enough to warrant hospitalization. We’ll have a better idea once testing is more broadly applied, but it would not surprise me if the widely cited case fatality rate of 1-2% is eventually less than half that.

(2) Children seem particularly protected from severe coronavirus disease. Many of the sniffles and colds kids experience are due to existing milder coronavirus strains, possibly giving them partial immunity to this more serious new threat.

(3) There has been extraordinary global cooperation from doctors, scientists and public health officials. In most cases, this has included remarkable sharing of clinical data and research. It is wonderful to see the medical community responding in such a unified voice, all of us trying to solve this new problem.

Guess I can still wear my “half full” T-shirt.

© PHD Ventures, 800 Corporate Pointe, Culver City, California, 90230, United States

Frey Freyday-Grit

(Frey Freyday is simply a bunch of inspirational, motivational and other quotes meant to make you think, reflect, smile, even laugh a bit. Hopefully helpful, useful stuff..)

I can’t think of anyone I admire who isn’t fuelled by self-doubt. It’s an essential ingredient. It’s the grit in the oyster. –Richard Eyre

It was proposed that individuals who possess a drive to tirelessly work through challenges, failures, and adversity to achieve set goals and are uniquely positioned to reach higher achievements than others who lack similar stamina. – Angela Duckworth

WORD TO LIVE BY:

GRIT – courage and resolve; strength of character.

 

In our day to day world, whether it is simply something with our job, our health, the economy, a loved one’s challenge – we all face different forms of adversity, failures, challenges, resistance, etc. It happens to all of us in different ways.

We can choose to step back and just avoid the challenge/resistance/effort needed, or we can gather up our grit and continue towards our goals.

So many people have good ideas, intelligence, good intentions, etc. So many people are created and gifted. But that alone doesn’t matter.

Grit. This is the thing that keeps you going back. We go back and find a different way. We learn from our mistakes. We do better, smarter, harder. We preserve. We keep swinging.

Humans do it all the time. The U.S. has a spirit of grit, the country was built on it. There is grit at the family level; parents trying to do better. Individuals trying to succeed, give back, grow, contribute, help others and follow their dreams. One step at a time, even if you just got pushed back 3 steps.

Frey Freyday was actually born out of something I created called “Words To Live By” (WTLB). Going forward, I will now not only share the quotes, as you may be used to receiving, but also a related (WTLB). In 1999, when we had our first daughter, I was contemplating how I would raise my new beautiful child, and I was thinking about how I can best educate her and my other children about values, morals, and other key thoughts about life. School offers education. Religion offers some values and morals. Parents offer most of it, sometimes intentionally, sometimes accidentally.

So I created a (WTLB) book, like a dictionary, which lists things like honesty, love, persistence, etc. with a definition that I created, with my wife’s input. I then turned it into a workbook with one word per page and space below for notes. For years we would discuss with my two daughters and they would draw pictures and make notes in the blank space. I may share some of those images with you. As they got older, they were less inclined to draw and more open to quotes and references from adults, hence where Frey Freyday came from….

You can read more at www.onewebstrategy.com

TED TALK:

Leaving a high-flying job in consulting, Angela Lee Duckworth took a job teaching math to seventh graders in a New York public school. She quickly realized that IQ wasn’t the only thing separating the successful students from those who struggled. Here, she explains her theory of “grit” as a predictor of success.

http://www.ted.com/talks/angela_lee_duckworth_the_key_to_success_grit

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