Monthly Archives: March 2018

Frey Freyday – What if?

(Frey Freyday is simply a bunch of inspirational, motivational and other quotes meant to make you think, reflect, smile, even laugh a bit. Hopefully helpful, useful stuff….)

Anytime you write something, you go through so many phases. You go through the ‘I’m a Fraud’ phase. You go through the ‘I’ll Never Finish’ phase. And every once in a while you think, ‘What if I actually have created what I set out to create, and it’s received as such?’ Lin-Manuel Miranda –

What if? Do it no matter what. If you believe in it, it is something very honorable. If somebody around you or your family does not understand it, then that’s their problem. But if you do have a passion, an honest passion, just do it. Mario Andretti –

Every album, I’m worried that I’m a dork and a fraud – ‘What if I can’t sing anymore?’ Then I stop thinking and start playing guitar, and I realize that it’s okay to suck, and move forward. Pink –

A lot of amateurs are terrified of going up against a player who is clearly better than they are. They never play their best, because they aren’t comfortable. There’s one surefire way to get over that, and it’s to ask yourself, ‘What if I beat him?’ Imagine the possibility. Fuzzy Zoeller –

In society, we have these unspoken rules of conduct, these ‘shoulds.’ Even though we pride ourselves on being a democracy, there are all these ways we say you ‘should’ behave. But what if you’re living your life by the ‘shoulds’ and you’re not really living your life? Chris Noth –

WORDS TO LIVE BY:

What if?– A powerful question that can help or hurt your state of mind and creativity.

The question “What if?” can take us down a rabbit-hole; a good one or bad one.

We can sit around and ask bad “What if?” questions like, what if he is lying somewhere in a ditch, what if I try and fail, what if I make a fool of myself, and things like that. We all do it but it isn’t really productive or helpful. Often these questions are part of worrying, and they make us ‘visualize negatively’. In other words, we picture bad stuff in our head, we visualize bad scenarios, limitations and so forth rather than the opposite.

It is OK to naturally ask these in reaction or reflex to situations – our reptilian brain reacts a certain way sometimes. The best thing to do is if you ask a ‘bad’ or ‘disempowering’ “What if?” question, be aware of it, don’t judge it, don’t beat yourself up, just be aware and recognize it. Then try to come up with a few empowering “What if?” questions and focus on them.

We can also sit around and ask “What if?” in a good way – what if we succeed, what if I meet the right person, what if I say the right thing, what if I have all I need within me now,…and so forth. These are empowering questions.

If we ask our brain a question, like a computer, it will search for an answer, so asking good “What if” questions can bring results….

“What if?”- if humans didn’t ask this, so many wonderful things would simply not exist.: Movies, books, Disney World, airplanes, inventions, innovations, relationships, cures, medicine, treatments, healing, research, results, answers…..

Asking “What if?” opens our mind up. We see a universe of possibilities ahead. The world opens.

For some people, asking ‘what if’ feels risky because it means you might have to acknowledge that what you’ve worked hard to put in place might not be the best solution. But if we don’t have the courage to question our assumptions we’re choosing to stagnate by default.

Also, sometimes asking a different “What if?” question can help remove some fear and anxiety we may have about something – sometimes it is best to just address the worst case scenario – “What if I fail or what if it really goes wrong, what is the worst that can happen?” Seriously, I’ve asked myself this a few times and I find that it is disarming – maybe I fail, so what? The worst thing is sometimes not that bad. Even if it is, sometimes just stating it takes away the power. What if I fail? I learn things, I learn how not to do something, how to do it better, and that’s life. We often learn more from failures that from successes.

Think about it, “What if ….Thomas Edison didn’t turn failure into success, what if the Wright Brothers just stuck to bicycles, what if ……..so many things in our past came from someone asking “What if?”

For the future, what are some good “What if?” questions? What if we can find a better way to talk about policy and politics? What if we can reimagine how we construct houses? What if we find better ways to address poverty? What if a simple solution could change the world?

It is exciting, isn’t it?

What if today you realized that you are enough?

What if you finally understood that you are loved and that you are capable of doing almost anything?

What if you could make the changes you know you need to make?

What if you had the courage to take action and pursue that “one” thing, right now?

What if you told someone that you cared about how you really felt?

What if you made an effort to connect to someone who is struggling?

What if you made the world a little better today? What if things went your way today? What if you are lucky?

What if we found a better way to do something?

What if we really listened to each other?

What is your “What if?”

Frey Freyday was actually born out of something I created called “Words To Live By” (WTLB). Going forward, I will now not only share the quotes, as you may be used to receiving, but also a related (WTLB). In 1999, when we had our first daughter, I was contemplating how I would raise my new beautiful child, and I was thinking about how I can best educate her and my other children about values, morals, and other key thoughts about life. School offers education. Religion offers some values and morals. Parents offer most of it, sometimes intentionally, sometimes accidentally.

So I created a (WTLB) book, like a dictionary, which lists things like honesty, love, persistence, etc. with a definition that I created, with my wife’s input. I then turned it into a workbook with one word per page and space below for notes. For years we would discuss with my two daughters and they would draw pictures and make notes in the blank space. I may share some of those images with you. As they got older, they were less inclined to draw and more open to quotes and references from adults, hence where Frey Freyday came from….

You can read more at www.onewebstrategy.com

BONUS :

Interactive Website: https://www.thehenryford.org/explore/stories-of-innovation/what-if/

Article: The Power Of ‘What If’ https://www.forbes.com/sites/mikemyatt/2013/02/08/the-power-of-what-if/#ff50ff9589f3

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Frey Freyday – Lucky

(Frey Freyday is simply a bunch of inspirational, motivational and other quotes meant to make you think, reflect, smile, even laugh a bit. Hopefully helpful, useful stuff….)

LUCK – [lək] – success or failure apparently brought by chance rather than through one’s own actions:

People often remark that I’m pretty lucky. Luck is only important in so far as getting the chance to sell yourself at the right moment. After that, you’ve got to have talent and know how to use it. Frank Sinatra –

Inspiration is one thing and you can’t control it, but hard work is what keeps the ship moving. Good luck means, work hard. Keep up the good work. Kevin Eubanks –

The best luck of all is the luck you make for yourself. Douglas MacArthur –

I’ve found that luck is quite predictable. If you want more luck, take more chances. Be more active. Show up more often. Brian Tracy –

Luck is where opportunity meets preparation. Seneca –

My success was due to good luck, hard work, and support and advice from friends and mentors. But most importantly, it depended on me to keep trying after I had failed. Mark Warner

Luck is a dividend of sweat. The more you sweat, the luckier you get. Ray Kroc –

Luck has nothing to do with it, because I have spent many, many hours, countless hours, on the court working for my one moment in time, not knowing when it would come. Serena Williams –

A career path is rarely a path at all. A more interesting life is usual a more crooked, winding path of missteps, luck and vigorous work. It is almost always a clumsy balance between the things you try to make happen and the things that happen to you. Tom Freston –

I busted a mirror and got seven years bad luck, but my lawyer thinks he can get me five. Steven Wright –

The way my luck is running, if I was a politician I would be honest. Rodney Dangerfield –

WORD TO LIVE BY:

 

LUCK –

Did you ever notice that when something good happens, some people say something like, “Hey, You’re lucky.”  Often it doesn’t really sound like a compliment, in fact it sounds much like they are either dismissing your success to something that came from any other than you or your efforts.

 

Many times when someone is jealous, envious or just plain doesn’t understand how hard you’ve worked, they might say this…..

 

Imagine the situation: You may have practiced, worked hard, called, walked, trained, or taken some action for a long period of time with plans and consideration – all things they don’t necessarily see or know about in the moment. They see the moment of your success and for whatever reason, the word “lucky” can discount our efforts.

 

There may be moments or situations of luck, true – but it is then what you do with those opportunities that matter. We’ve all had opportunities come and go and we did nothing. Maybe it was luck that brought the moment to us but we didn’t act in time. Or perhaps we tried to act but we weren’t prepared to do enough. There are also other times when we had a chance, we were prepared enough, and we took it and used our talents to move ahead, to take advantage of the situation for the better.

 

Luck doesn’t come to those who wait around. One must go out and take action, “Keep Swinging” as they say – by honing one’s skills, keeping a good attitude and focus, and simply by taking consistent action, Luck finds us.

 

Luck is also very much about our focus and how we frame things – how we assign meaning to events in life. I know people who complain when they are busy, when they are not. They are unhappy by a variety of circumstances. These types of people never feel lucky even though “good things” do come their way. They’re often not much fun to be around either.

 

Similarly, I know people who have gone through tough times, who face adversity but they feel lucky for it, and they are grateful. I am confident that those people see more luck in the world and they probably create more of it too. Frankly, most of us like to be around people like this.

 

Like the Chinese proverb below about luck and fortune, two people can see the same event differently. We can choose to see our own lives as lucky if we choose to do so.

CHINESE PROVERB: Sāi Wēng lived on the border and he raised horses for a living. One day, he lost one of his prized horses. After hearing of the misfortune, his neighbor felt sorry for him and came to comfort him. But Sāi Wēng simply asked, “How could we know it is not a good thing for me?”

After a while, the lost horse returned and with another beautiful horse. The neighbor came over again and congratulated  Sāi Wēng on his good fortune. But Sāi Wēng simply asked, “How could we know it is not a bad thing for me?”

One day, his son went out for a ride with the new horse. He was violently thrown from the horse and broke his leg. The neighbors once again expressed their condolences to Sāi Wēng, but Sāi Wēng simply said, “How could we know it is not a good thing for me?” One year later, the Emperor’s army arrived at the village to recruit all able-bodied men to fight in the war. Because of his injury, Sāi Wēng’s son could not go off to war, and was spared from certain death.

 

I am lucky. My career, my family, my friends, my wife, my daughters – I was born into a great family and situation and many good things have come my way. I don’t always recognize or remember it but I am. How are you lucky?

Frey Freyday was actually born out of something I created called “Words To Live By” (WTLB). Going forward, I will now not only share the quotes, as you may be used to receiving, but also a related (WTLB). In 1999, when we had our first daughter, I was contemplating how I would raise my new beautiful child, and I was thinking about how I can best educate her and my other children about values, morals, and other key thoughts about life. School offers education. Religion offers some values and morals. Parents offer most of it, sometimes intentionally, sometimes accidentally.

So I created a (WTLB) book, like a dictionary, which lists things like honesty, love, persistence, etc. with a definition that I created, with my wife’s input. I then turned it into a workbook with one word per page and space below for notes. For years we would discuss with my two daughters and they would draw pictures and make notes in the blank space. I may share some of those images with you. As they got older, they were less inclined to draw and more open to quotes and references from adults, hence where Frey Freyday came from….

 

You have the choice

https://onewebstrategy.wordpress.com/2017/05/10/you-have-the-choice/

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