Monthly Archives: December 2015

Mindful Mantras For Weight Loss

Jean Kristeller's 10-week program in The Joy of Half A Cookie is designed to curb overeating, help you feel your hunger and trust your taste buds.

Jean Kristeller’s 10-week program in The Joy of Half A Cookie is designed to curb overeating, help you feel your hunger and trust your taste buds.

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Every now and then, a Julia Child or Michael Pollan come along and changes the way we eat.

Could Jean Kristeller, America’s leading mindful eating researcher and the author of a new self-help book, The Joy of Half a Cookie, published Tuesday, be next? I’m of a mind to say maybe.

Back when Kristeller, now a professor of psychology emeritus at Indiana State University, was a grad student at Yale in the late 1970s and early 1980s, she had a compulsive overeating problem. She had been meditating for years, and decided to apply what she was studying about eating regulation and the mind-body connection toher overeating. As she writes, it was transformative. Once she got a handle on it, she developed a mindfulness training for a variety of eating issues called Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training, or MB-EAT, and set out to test its effectiveness.

The Joy of Half a Cookie
The Joy of Half a Cookie

Using Mindfulness to Lose Weight and End the Struggle With Food

by Jean Kristeller and Alisa Bowman

Hardcover, 278 pages

In several studies, Kristeller has shown that the practice of mindfulness meditation and mindful eating effectively decrease binge eating and increase an inner sense of control overeating.

She’s also been exploring MB-EAT for weight loss in a study which began in 2004 and compared MB-EAT to a widely used meditation program (Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction) and a standardized Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. She has yet to publish this study, but the preliminary data show that MB-EAT’s added calorie-cutting suggestions and healthy eating strategies dofacilitate significant weight loss in the short-term. (The study subjects — 225 obese men and women binge eaters — lost about a pound a week on average.) Whether or not the training facilitates significant long-term weight loss (at the 18-month follow up) is still to be determined.

The 10-week plan involves a combination of mindfulness meditations and mindful-eating practices, healthy eating and calorie-cutting strategies. More specifically, it’s designed to curb overeating, help you feel your hunger, trust your taste buds and become deeply satisfied with the quality, rather than quantity, of food.

If I hadn’t seen the transformative effect of Kristeller’s proven practices in my own practice as an eating disorder therapist, I probably wouldn’t bother reading yet another mindful eating book. (I’ve read many.) But I had, so I did, and I’m thrilled this research psychologist has transformed her group training into a do-it-yourself plan.

I put Joy of Half a Cookie up there with Mastering the Art of French Cooking and The Omnivore’s Dilemma because I’ve seen the measurable and pleasurable difference Kristeller’s plan has made to me and my clients. Although she and I have traversed the same territory for decades, the one time I heard the describe her training, it forever changed the way I work with the range of eating issues.

Still, I had some concerns and questions I wanted to run by Kristeller. What follows is an edited version of that recent exchange.

Before you discovered mindful eating, you describe being trapped in a vicious cycle of under-eating by day, overeating by night. How did you discover that mindfulness could break that cycle?

My first transformative eating experience was inspired by Susie Orbach’s Fat Is a Feminist Issue. For one week, I permitted myself to lunch on high-fat, high-sugary foods [as recommended by the book]. The first few days, I savored snack machine chips and cookies. They tasted pretty good, but I didn’t crave more after dinner. When the packaged snacks lost their appeal, I went for fresh croissants one day, a few pizza slices the next. By week’s end, I was starting to tune into my hunger, fullness and food enjoyment with what I would now call “mindfulness.”

You say MB-EAT isn’t a diet, but you recommend weighing and measuring portions and other dieting strategies. What’s the difference?

Diets prescribe certain foods and amounts of food for relatively rapid weight loss. They bear little relationship to a flexible, sustainable eating approach. Yet calories do “count.”

I don’t recommend aiming for a certain number of calories per day. Rather, I encourage a more exploratory approach to calorie content — noticing the amount of cereal in your bowl, butter on your toast, meat on your plate. Like a budget, you wouldn’t shop without looking at price tags. And, if your income dropped by 25 percent, you’d need to cut expenditures, but not watch every penny or always spend exactly the same amount.

Given that caloric restriction can be a recipe for overeating, if not disordered eating, for some people, why do you challenge readers to cut 500 calories per day, forever, from their diet?

Most diets drop caloric intake by at least 1,000 calories per day. The 500-calorie challenge is about finding sustainable ways to cut calories, which is neither overly restrictive nor, in our experience, does it trigger overeating. Rather, I encourage people to cut “mindless calories”: forego extra servings, refrain from cleaning your plate when full, swap higher calorie snacks for enjoyable lower calorie ones.

Nowhere do you mention how much weight study subjects lost. How muchdid they lose?

Average weight loss was relatively modest — about one pound per week or seven pounds. Some lost over 20 pounds, and some lost little, but, unlike our first NIH trial, which focused on binge eating, not weight loss, none gained weight. However, even in that study, a third of participants lost weight just eating mindfully.

According to a recent systematic review, mindfulness training decreases binge and emotional eating, but fails to facilitate significant weight loss. So why do you prescribe mindfulness for weight loss?

Mindfulness greatly decreases the struggle with food. Weight loss happens slowly, as is appropriate. Although some effects can and do happen quickly, learning to apply them in range of situations takes time and an ongoing sense of discovery.


After some hemming and hawing, my conclusion is as follows: If you want to lose weight and end the struggle with food, by all means, dive into Kristeller’s practices for cultivating inner wisdom.

But can you achieve long-term weight loss with this? Only time and the results of her follow-up research will tell if, in fact, her approach works.


Jean Fain is a Harvard Medical School-affiliated psychotherapist and the author ofThe Self-Compassion Diet.

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Japan – 日本

I want to give a ‘shot out’ to different countries that have visited my site in 2015.

Thank you for visiting http://www.onewebstrategy.com !

Please make a comment!

Now- in 2015, 22 people from Japan visited this site, thank yoU!

私は、’ショット ‘ 2015 年に私のサイトを訪問している異なった国に与えたいです。

Www.onewebstrategy.com を訪問いただきありがとうございます!

コメントしてください!

今-2015 年に日本から 22 人がありがとうございます、このサイトを訪問!

Malaysia

I want to give a ‘shot out’ to different countries that have visited my site in 2015.

Thank you for visiting http://www.onewebstrategy.com !

Please make a comment!

Now- in 2015, 64 people from Malaysia visited this site, thanks!

New FAFSA rules should make process less stressful

Do you have kids going to college soon?
Have you heard of FAFSA?

http://www.marketplace.org/2015/12/29/education/new-fafsa-rules-should-make-process-less-stressful

New FAFSA rules should make process less stressful

​New rules for FAFSA filing will allow use of older tax data, which means financial aid offers will arrive sooner.

With the new year beginning Friday comes a new Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA. That’s the dreaded form college students and their parents have to fill out to in order to get financial aid. But there are some changes coming in 2016 that should make the process a little less painful.

The FAFSA has long had a timing problem. The new form comes out each year on January 1, but requires information from the federal tax return that most people will be filing much later.

“This meant that families couldn’t find out about financial aid until quite often well after they’d heard about admissions,” said Susan Dynarski, a professor at the University of Michigan.

Starting in October 2016, families will be able apply for aid three months earlier. They’ll also be able to use tax data from the previous year and import it online from the IRS.

David Levy, editor of Edvisors.com, said it means financial aid offers will arrive much sooner.

“That’s going to, we think, help students and families to make more informed decisions about which colleges to attend,” he said.

During this transition year, Levy said people should fill out the FAFSA with estimated tax data as early as they can. Students who file between January and March tend to get twice as much grant aid, he said, as those who wait until after April.

THE HOLIDAY THRIVE GUIDE

THE HOLIDAY THRIVE GUIDE

HOW TO THRIVE, NOT JUST SURVIVE, THIS HOLIDAY SEASON

JOIN NEWSLETTER

The holiday season is teeming with decadent desserts, rich beverages and joyful festivities that disrupt even the most disciplined diet. And with colder weather and darker nights, the challenge of working out on a consistent basis becomes even more daunting. That’s why we’ve compiled an arsenal of tips and tactics that will help you beat the winter workout rut, detect hidden sugars, leverage the power of hydration and the benefits of acupuncture, so you can enjoy yourself all season long, while still taking care of yourself and staying committed to your well-being.

It’s the most wonderful time of the year. But it’s also one of the most stressful. And with all of the obligations of gift-buying, traveling and festivities, the holidays can add undue pressure to a relationship. That’s why it’s critical to learn how to support your partner through the stressful times, to make it a point to see your partner’s perspective, and to stay connected and ensure you are both feeling good about your budgets, holiday plans and expectations.

Hostess gifts for the holiday parties, decorations, presents for the family, bonuses for the doorman or newspaper delivery boy, and maybe that little something for yourself – it is all too easy for your finances to get out of control during the holidays. Rather than having your holidays tainted with mountains of stress over how much you’ve spent, let us help you remain present in your celebrations with advice on beating financial fear, financially detoxing, and some tips onhow to reach your financial goals faster.

Holiday festivities can turn a less-than-beautiful office building into a winter wonderland with parties, secret Santas and the never-ending stream of delicious treats. It can also make your business significantly less productive. Keep your employees – and yourself – away from distractions like online shopping by keeping the vision of the company’s mission the the forefront and by creating raving fans, especially within your company.

The holiday season is full of joy, but it’s also a time to look back on the past year and reflect on what you’ve accomplished. Sometimes we start the year off full of ambition, but instead of pacing ourselves, we burn out too quickly or lose motivation only part of the way through. Find out if you are you sabotaging your own success and what is really driving your decisions. Or, if you’re feeling stuck, find out how to break through the plateau. The holiday season is your time to think about what’s really important and head into the coming year with new focus and energy.

Holiday Thrive Guide

The holiday season is teeming with decadent desserts, rich beverages and joyful festivities that disrupt even the most disciplined diet. And with colder weather and darker nights, the challenge of working out on a consistent basis becomes even more daunting. That’s why we’ve compiled an arsenal of tips and tactics that will help you beat the winter workout rut, detect hidden sugars, leverage the power of hydration and the benefits of acupuncture, so you can enjoy yourself all season long, while still taking care of yourself and staying committed to your well-being.

It’s the most wonderful time of the year. But it’s also one of the most stressful. And with all of the obligations of gift-buying, traveling and festivities, the holidays can add undue pressure to a relationship. That’s why it’s critical to learn how to support your partner through the stressful times, to make it a point to see your partner’s perspective, and to stay connected and ensure you are both feeling good about your budgets, holiday plans and expectations.

Hostess gifts for the holiday parties, decorations, presents for the family, bonuses for the doorman or newspaper delivery boy, and maybe that little something for yourself – it is all too easy for your finances to get out of control during the holidays. Rather than having your holidays tainted with mountains of stress over how much you’ve spent, let us help you remain present in your celebrations with advice on beating financial fear, financially detoxing, and some tips onhow to reach your financial goals faster.

Holiday festivities can turn a less-than-beautiful office building into a winter wonderland with parties, secret Santas and the never-ending stream of delicious treats. It can also make your business significantly less productive. Keep your employees – and yourself – away from distractions like online shopping by keeping the vision of the company’s mission the the forefront and by creating raving fans, especially within your company.

The holiday season is full of joy, but it’s also a time to look back on the past year and reflect on what you’ve accomplished. Sometimes we start the year off full of ambition, but instead of pacing ourselves, we burn out too quickly or lose motivation only part of the way through. Find out if you are you sabotaging your own success and what is really driving your decisions. Or, if you’re feeling stuck, find out how to break through the plateau. The holiday season is your time to think about what’s really important and head into the coming year with new focus and energy.

Frey Freyday – Giving

(Frey Freyday is simply a bunch of inspirational, motivational and other quotes meant to make you think, reflect, smile, even laugh a bit. Hopefully helpful, useful stuff….)

Christmas is the spirit of giving without a thought of getting. It is happiness because we see joy in people. It is forgetting self and finding time for others. It is discarding the meaningless and stressing the true values.-Thomas S. Monson


Kindness in words creates confidence. Kindness in thinking creates profoundness. Kindness in giving creates love.-Lao Tzu

Christmas is a tonic for our souls. It moves us to think of others rather than of ourselves. It directs our thoughts to giving.-B. C. Forbes


Remember that the happiest people are not those getting more, but those giving more.-H. Jackson Brown, Jr.

For it is in giving that we receive.-Francis of Assisi

A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another.-Jesus Christ


Let us not be satisfied with just giving money. Money is not enough, money can be got, but they need your hearts to love them. So, spread your love everywhere you go.-Mother Teresa

You can give without loving, but you can never love without giving.-Robert Louis Stevenson

Word to Live By:

 Give – [giv] – freely transfer the possession of (something) to (someone); carry out or perform (a specified action):

To truly feed your spirit, remember this: The secret to living is giving. No matter how busy or broke you may be, you have something to offer others. So many people miss the opportunity to know that their life makes a difference – but it does. I know personally for me when things were not going well, I went out and volunteered when I felt I had basically nothing to give, but it helped things get better. Your life matters – and if you align yourself to be congruent with the truth that you’re here not just to “get” but to give, then other people will feel your authenticity and they will open up to you.

When you give back to other people and your community, it reminds you what you’re made for. Focusing on the needs of others has a way of motivating you to do more than you thought possible. You feel the benefits immediately. You become more productive. You find creative solutions to problems. You find strength when you’re exhausted. That’s because life supports that which improves the quality of life. When we contribute to our community, we become part of something that is bigger than ourselves.

Frey Freyday was actually born out of something I created called “Words To Live By” (WTLB). Going forward, I will now not only share the quotes, as you may be used to receiving, but also a related (WTLB). In 1999, when we had our first daughter, I was contemplating how I would raise my new beautiful child, and I was thinking about how I can best educate her and my other children about values, morals, and other key thoughts about life. School offers education. Religion offers some values and morals. Parents offer most of it, sometimes intentionally, sometimes accidentally.

So I created a (WTLB) book, like a dictionary, which lists things like honesty, love, persistence, etc. with a definition that I created, with my wife’s input. I then turned it into a workbook with one word per page and space below for notes. For years we would discuss with my two daughters and they would draw pictures and make notes in the blank space. I may share some of those images with you. As they got older, they were less inclined to draw and more open to quotes and references from adults, hence where Frey Freyday came from….

 

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