Monthly Archives: January 2015

Frey Freyday-Beliefs

(Frey Freyday is simply a bunch of inspirational, motivational and other quotes meant to make you think, reflect, smile, even laugh a bit. Hopefully helpful, useful stuff….)

Believe that life is worth living and your belief will help create the fact. Belief creates the actual fact.-William James

– It’s the repetition of affirmations that leads to belief. And once that belief becomes a deep conviction, things begin to happen.-Muhammad Ali

One person with a belief is equal to ninety-nine who have only interests.-John Stuart Mill

– Envy comes from people’s ignorance of, or lack of belief in, their own gifts.-Jean Vanier

Nothing great has ever been achieved except by those who dared believe that something inside them was superior to circumstances. – Bruce Barton –

Realizing that our actions, feelings and behaviour are the result of our own images and beliefs gives us the level that psychology has always needed for changing personality.-Maxwell Maltz

It’s not the events of our lives that shape us, but our beliefs as to what those events mean.-Tony Robbins

– Live your beliefs and you can turn the world around.-Henry David Thoreau

– Frisbeetarianism is the belief that when you die, your soul goes up on the roof and gets stuck.-George Carlin

Words to Live By:

Beliefs – [ biˈlēf ] – Your beliefs are everything. Beliefs make up your personality, they create habits which lead to your lifestyle, your relationships, your career, etc. Beliefs can limit you or they can help you excel and grow. The meaning we assign to all sorts of things are related to beliefs. If you believe you’re smart, for instance, you will be more likely to act in a smart manner, make smart choices, and act according to that identity.
Bonus: Ted Talk – http://www.ted.com/talks/caroline_casey_looking_past_limits

Activist Caroline Casey tells the story of her extraordinary life, starting with a revelation (no spoilers). In a talk that challenges perceptions, Casey asks us all to move beyond the limits we may think we have.

Why Teens Are Impulsive, Addiction-Prone And Should Protect Their Brains

A great article/interview from NPR

Why Teens Are Impulsive, Addiction-Prone And Should Protect Their Brains

FYI

Teens can’t control impulses and make rapid smart decisions like adults can — but why?

Research into how the human brain develops helps explain. In a teenager, the frontal lobe of the brain, which controls decision-making, is built, but not fully insulated — so signals move slowly.

“Teenagers are not as readily able to access their frontal lobe to say, ‘Oh, I better not do this,’ ” Dr. Frances Jensen tells Fresh Air‘s Terry Gross.

The Teenage Brain

A Neuroscientist’s Survival Guide to Raising Adolescents and Young Adults

by Frances E., M.D. Jensen and Amy Ellis Nutt

Jensen, who’s a neuroscientist and was a single mother of two boys who are now in their 20s, has written The Teenage Brain to explore the science of how the brain grows — and why teenagers can be especially impulsive, moody and not very good at responsible decision-making.

“We have a natural insulation … called myelin,” she says. “It’s a fat, and it takes time. Cells have to build myelin and they grow it around the outside of these tracks and that takes years.”

This insulation process starts in the back of the brain and heads toward the front. Brains aren’t fully mature until people are in their early 20s, possibly late 20s and maybe even beyond, Jensen says.

“The last place to be connected — to be fully myelinated — is the front of your brain,” Jensen says. “And what’s in the front? Your prefrontal cortex and your frontal cortex. These are areas where we have insight, empathy, these executive functions such as impulse control, risk-taking behavior.”

This research also explains why teenagers can be especially susceptible to addictions — including drugs, alcohol, smoking and digital devices.


Interview Highlights

On why teenagers are more prone to addiction

Addiction is actually a form of learning. … What happens in addiction is there’s also repeated exposure, except it’s to a substance and it’s not in the part of the brain we use for learning — it’s in the reward-seeking area of your brain. … It’s happening in the same way that learning stimulates and enhances a synapse. Substances do the same thing. They build a reward circuit around that substance to a much stronger, harder, longer addiction.

Just like learning a fact is more efficient, sadly, addiction is more efficient in the adolescent brain. That is an important fact for an adolescent to know about themselves — that they can get addicted faster.

It also is a way to debunk the myth, by the way, that, “Oh, teens are resilient, they’ll be fine. He can just go off and drink or do this or that. They’ll bounce back.” Actually, it’s quite the contrary. The effects of substances are more permanent on the teen brain. They have more deleterious effects and can be more toxic to the teen than the adult.

On the effects of binge drinking and marijuana on the teenage brain

Binge drinking can actually kill brain cells in the adolescent brain where it does not to the same extent in the adult brain. So for the same amount of alcohol, you can actually have brain damage — permanent brain damage — in an adolescent for the same blood alcohol level that may cause bad sedation in the adult, but not actual brain damage.

Dr. Frances Jensen is a professor and chair of the Department of Neurology at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine.

Courtesy of Harper Collins

Because they have more plasticity, more substrate, a lot of these drugs of abuse are going to lock onto more targets in [adolescents’] brains than in an adult, for instance. We have natural cannabinoids, they’re called, in the brain. We have kind of a natural substance that actually locks onto receptors on brain cells. It has, for the most part, a more dampening sedative effect. So when you actually ingest or smoke or get cannabis into your bloodstream, it does get into the brain and it goes to these same targets.

It turns out that these targets actually block the process of learning and memory so that you have an impairment of being able to lay down new memories. What’s interesting is not only does the teen brain have more space for the cannabis to actually land, if you will, it actually stays there longer. It locks on longer than in the adult brain. … For instance, if they were to get high over a weekend, the effects may be still there on Thursday and Friday later that week. An adult wouldn’t have that same long-term effect.

On marijuana’s effect on IQ

People who are chronic marijuana users between 13 and 17, people who [use daily or frequently] for a period of time, like a year plus, have shown to have decreased verbal IQ and their functional MRIs look different when they’re imaged during a task. There’s been a permanent change in their brains as a result of this that they may not ever be able to recover.

It is a fascinating fact that I uncovered going through the literature around adolescence is our IQs are still malleable into the teen years. I know that I remember thinking and being brought up with, “Well, you have that IQ test that was done in grade school with some standardized process and that’s your number, you’ve got it for life, whatever that number is, that’s who you are.”

It turns out that’s not true at all. During the teen years approximately a third of the people stayed the same, a third actually increased their IQ and a third decreased their IQ. We don’t know a lot about exactly what makes your IQ go up and down, the study is still ongoing, but we do know some things that make your IQ go down and that is chronic pot-smoking.

On teenagers’ access to constant stimuli

We, as humans, are very novelty-seeking. We are built to seek novelty and want to acquire new stimuli. So, when you think about it, our social media is just a wealth of new stimuli that you can access at all times. The problem with the adolescent is that they may not have the insider judgment, because their frontal lobes aren’t completely online yet, to know when to stop. To know when to say, “This is not a safe piece of information for me to look at. If I go and look at this atrocious violent video, it may stick with me for the rest of my life — this image — and this may not be a good thing to be carrying with me.” They are unaware of when to gate themselves.

On not allowing teenagers to have their cellphones at night

It may or may not be enforceable. I think the point is that when they’re trying to go to sleep — to have this incredibly alluring opportunity to network socially or be stimulated by a computer or a cellphone really disrupts sleep patterns. Again, it’s also not great to have multiple channels of stimulation while you’re trying to memorize for a test the next day, for instance.

So I think I would restate that and say especially when they’re trying to go to sleep, to really try to suggest that they don’t go under the sheets and have their cell phone on and be tweeting people.

First of all, the artificial light can affect your brain, it decreases some chemicals in your brain that help promote sleep such as melatonin, so we know that artificial light is not good for the brain. That’s why I think there have been studies that show that reading books with a regular warm light doesn’t disrupt sleep to the extent that using a Kindle does.

20 Ways to Get Happy

Click here

this is a good ‘photo gallery’ and article about 20 ways to get happy

http://www.msn.com/en-us/health/wellness/20-ways-to-get-happy-almost-instantly

Frey Freyday-Smile

(Frey Freyday is simply a bunch of inspirational, motivational and other quotes meant to make you think, reflect, smile, even laugh a bit. Hopefully helpful, useful stuff….)

A warm smile is the universal language of kindness.-William Arthur Ward

If you smile when no one else is around, you really mean it.-Andy Rooney

A smile is a curve that sets everything straight.-Phyllis Diller

We shall never know all the good that a simple smile can do.-Mother Teresa

Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around.-Leo Buscaglia

The real man smiles in trouble, gathers strength from distress, and grows brave by reflection.-Thomas Paine

Smiling is definitely one of the best beauty remedies. If you have a good sense of humor and a good approach to life, that’s beautiful.-Rashida Jones

Colors are the smiles of nature.-Leigh Hunt

The happiness of life is made up of minute fractions – the little, soon forgotten charities of a kiss or a smile, a kind look or heartfelt compliment.-Samuel Taylor Coleridge

There’s nothing I value more than the closeness of friends and family, a smile as I pass someone on the street.-Willie Stargell

The Best Makeup Is Your Smile. By J. Johnson

Words to Live By:

Smile – \ˈsmī(-ə)l\ – A smile is a facial expression formed primarily by flexing the muscles at the sides of the mouth. Try to smile at any appropriate chance you get. Give a smile to a stranger, a friend, a loved one. Everyone looks better with a smile. The right smile, at the right time, wins friends and calms enemies. A recent study found that in obituaries people often, more than any other attribute, mentioned their loved one’s smile. Putting a smile on your face will boost your mood and increase your potential for long-term happiness.

A genuine smile also sends the message to others that we are likeable, trustworthy and dependable – the kind of person others want to do business with, engage in conversation, or build meaningful relationships with.

Smiling stimulates our brain’s reward mechanisms in a way that even chocolate, a well-regarded pleasure-inducer, cannot match. Smiling reduces stress that your body and mind feel, almost similar to getting good sleep, according to recent studies. Smiling helps to generate more positive emotions within you.

 

Bonus: Ted Talk -The hidden power of smiling

http://www.ted.com/talks/ron_gutman_the_hidden_power_of_smiling

(FYI-Frey Freyday was actually born out of something I created called “Words To Live By” (WTLB). Going forward, I will now not only share the quotes, as you may be used to receiving, but also a related (WTLB). In 1999, when we had our first daughter, I was contemplating how I would raise my new beautiful child, and I was thinking about how I can best educate her and my other children about values, morals, and other key thoughts about life. So I created (WTLB).)

 

Teens Who Skimp On Sleep Now Have More Drinking Problems Later

Teens Who Skimp On Sleep Now Have More Drinking Problems Later

Missing out on sleep can lead to more than grumpiness. Teenagers who aren’t getting enough sleep are also more apt to binge drink, a study finds, even years later.

Read more at 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2015/01/16/377720744/teens-who-skimp-on-sleep-now-have-more-drinking-problems-later

Frey Freyday (Re-tooled): Parents

(Frey Freyday is simply a bunch of inspirational, motivational and other quotes meant to make you think, reflect, smile, even laugh a bit. Hopefully helpful, useful stuff….)

UPDATE: I took time over the holidays to reflect and retool. Hopefully Freydays were missed and hopefully you now welcome the return:

Frey Freyday was actually born out of something I created called “Words To Live By” (WTLB). Going forward, I will now not only share the quotes, as you may be used to receiving, but also a related (WTLB). In 1999, when we had our first daughter, I was contemplating how I would raise my new beautiful child, and I was thinking about how I can best educate her and my other children about values, morals, and other key thoughts about life. School offers education. Religion offers some values and morals. Parents offer most of it, sometimes intentionally, sometimes accidentally.

So I created a (WTLB) book, like a dictionary, which lists things like honesty, love, persistence, etc. with a definition that I created, with my wife’s input. I then turned it into a workbook with one word per page and space below for notes. For years we would discuss with my two daughters and they would draw pictures and make notes in the blank space. I may share some of those images with you. As they got older, they were less inclined to draw and more open to quotes and references from adults, hence where Frey Freyday came from….

I dedicate this first Frey Freyday/Word To Live By to my parents, Jim and Joan………..

par·ent (pâr′ənt, păr′-) -Parents can be any couple (or individual) that gives birth, adopts, acts as a guardian or otherwise raises a child. It takes almost no effort or care to be a father or mother. It takes lots of love, care, and attention to be a Mom or Dad. A parent provides unconditional love, guidance, listening, nurturing, protection, education, support, morals, values, resilience, commitment, leadership, humor, and ideas. Just like the child, the parent learns along the way too, they do their best. One of the hardest things for a parent to do is also the best thing a parent can do (eventually) and that’s give a child the gift of independence and eventually ‘let go’ and have faith in their child.

[Note: children will never really know what the love for a child is like until they are a parent]

——

One of the greatest titles in the world is parent, and one of the biggest blessings in the world is to have parents to call mom and dad. -Jim DeMint

At the end of the day, the most overwhelming key to a child’s success is the positive involvement of parents. -Jane D. Hull


Respect your parents. What they tell you is true. Hard work, dedication and faith will get you anything. Imagination will drive itself. You can get anything you want, but you have to have faith behind all your ideas. Stick to your goals and have an undying faith. -Russell Simmons


How true Daddy’s words were when he said: all children must look after their own upbringing. Parents can only give good advice or put them on the right paths, but the final forming of a person’s character lies in their own hands. -Anne Frank


Children learn to smile from their parents.-Shinichi Suzuki

The child supplies the power but the parents have to do the steering.-Benjamin Spock


We never know the love of a parent till we become parents ourselves.-Henry Ward Beecher


If at first you don’t succeed, blame your parents.-Marcelene Cox

When I was a kid my parents moved a lot, but I always found them.- Rodney Dangerfield

6 Things You Should Be Able To Do Without Your iPhone

6 Things You Should Be Able To Do Without Your iPhone
https://www.yahoo.com/health/6-things-you-should-be-able-to-do-without-your-107903805202.html

Cassie Shortsleeve
January 12, 2015
TumblrFacebookTwitterPinterestMailWhatsApp
6 Things You Should Be Able To Do Without Your iPhone

A new study gives good incentive for putting your device down. (Photo: Getty Images)

Are you a slave to the beep? Stepping away from your device may be easier said than done: Cellphone separation is linked to anxiety and poor cognitive performance, according to a new University of Missouri study.

Researchers found that when iPhone users weren’t allowed to answer a ringing phone, their heart rates and blood pressure levels surged and they felt more anxiety and overall unpleasantness. They also performed worse on word search puzzles after their phones were taken away vs. when they were near.

A 2014 IIHS Top Safety Pick
Mazda USA Sponsored

“Our findings suggest that iPhone separation can negatively impact performance on mental tasks,” Russell Clayton, a doctoral candidate at the University of Missouri School of Journalism and lead author of the study, said in a press release.

But we say that there are certain things you should simply be able to do without your smartphone. Here, six of them.

1. Your job

Surveys have suggested that somewhere around 80 percent of people check their email outside of work. (We suspect it’s closer to 100 percent.) But answering your boss at 10 p.m. may not make you a stellar employee. “Telepressure,” or the urge to answer work emails ASAP, could actually make you worse at your job. A 2014 study in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology found that the more people fixated on answering work emails on the go after hours, the more likely they were to feel burnout, sleep poorly, lack focus, and even miss work. Some companies—and even countries—have even considered banning post-work emails to help with productivity and rejuvenation.

Will YOU Win $5,000.00 a Week “Forever” ?
Publishers Clearing House Sponsored

2. Eat out

“Too many people instinctually just dump their smartphone on the table when meeting someone for a meal. It’s like a guest whose only role is to interrupt everyone,” says Daniel Sieberg, author of The Digital Diet: The 4-step plan to break your tech addiction and regain balance in your life. Plus, the mere presence of a phone on the table can lower the quality of conversations, research shows. “Keep your smartphone in your pocket or purse and if you must have it out for an urgent call or message, then let the person/people with you know why,” Sieberg suggests. Another trick: the phone stack. “Everyone puts their phone in the middle of the table and the first one to grabs theirs pays the bill.”

Buffett’s Empire Is At Risk…And He Knows It
The Motley Fool Sponsored

3. Drive from point A to point B

The majority of us may rely on GPS, but here’s a case for giving the Google Maps app a rest: According to a well-cited British study, learning 25,000 streets and thousands of landmarks leads the brains of London cab drivers to undergo structural changes that improve memory, and creates more nerve cells in a brain area called the hippocampus.

4. Walk

Two in five teens have been hit —or nearly hit— by a car or bike while walking, according to a recent report that determined most of those incidents involved people using mobile devices. And sure, this epidemic may be worse in cities like New York, where distracted pedestrians play bumper cars on the sidewalk, but many of us are guilty just checking our phones while walking into the grocery store or down the street, notes Sieberg. “Look look around and engage with your surroundings. It may be a way to discover a new café or appreciate nature. It’s also an opportunity to be alone and channel your own thoughts instead of bombarded by stimulus,” says Sieberg.

Sears® Official Site
Sears® Sponsored

5. Spend time with your kids

“Every parent knows the tug of a smartphone can be a tough one to ignore when playing with small children. Whether at a playground or walking to school with them, it’s too easy to check out of the moment and thumb through your screen,” says Sieberg. Plus, studies have shown that parents who are glued to their devices report more negative interactions with their kids. Resist the urge: That quality time that is special — and children learn from the behavior around them. “If you worry about your kids always on their devices then maybe it’s time to look in the mirror,” reminds Sieberg.

6. Sleep

“Charging smartphones in the bedroom is a perfect recipe for reduced sleep, added anxiety, and minimal intimacy,” says Sieberg. Banning cellphones should be the new “no TV in the bedroom” rule. “Without giving ourselves a break at the start and end of the day, we’re constantly swept away by being connected and unable to let our brain recharge,” he adds. Plus, research confirms that a smartphone screen may actually disrupt our circadian rhythms — worsening productivity and sleep quality, says Sieberg. “Do yourself (and your spouse) a favor and charge it anywhere else.”

%d bloggers like this: