Monthly Archives: October 2013

Simple Stuff – labels, expectations

 (simple stuff is simply a bunch of inspirational, motivational and other quotes meant to make you think, reflect, smile, even laugh a bit. Hopefully helpful, useful stuff….)

 

Do you want to know who you are? Don’t ask. Act! Action will delineate and define you. –Thomas Jefferson

Never allow yourself to be made a victim. Accept no one’s definition of your life; define yourself. –Harvey Fierstein

Once you label me you negate me. –Soren Kierkegaard

If you accept the expectations of others, especially negative ones, then you never will change the outcome. –Michael Jordan

I’m not in this world to live up to your expectations and you’re not in this world to live up to mine. –Bruce Lee

Never idealize others. They will never live up to your expectations. –Leo Buscaglia

 

If you only have a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail. –Abraham Maslow

Winners make a habit of manufacturing their own positive expectations in advance of the event. –Brian Tracy

Expectations are a form of first-class truth: If people believe it, it’s true.-Bill Gates

You can’t base your life on other people’s expectations. –Stevie Wonder

 

If you were to look up your name in the dictionary, how would you be defined? Would three words just about cover it, or would your epic narrative consume page after page—or even demand a volume of its own? – Tony Robbins

How to create harmony in a group

A video and quick blog From: robbinsmadanestraining.com

Know anyone who has a strained relationship with a family member or friend? Or a business partnership jeopardized by misunderstanding? Of course you do.

Well, in today’s Robbins-Madanes intervention, you’re going to see a process for setting aside resentments and reuniting people. There is no stage, no audience – just Tony and a family around a table.

You’ll learn a process for looking beyond limiting communication patterns, perceiving people’s true deeper needs, and healing your relationships. In 45 minutes Tony was able to resolve a conflict that had caused this family untold struggle and pain for over 5 years.

Click here to see it

We begin the story with Tony surprising Ron and Marie as they pull up to their house… and then comes the real shock! I hope you’ll take the opportunity to learn this valuable process for yourself, your family and friends, and your clients.

Greatest Financial Gift You Can Give to Your Children

The Greatest Financial Gift You Can Give to Your Children

I recently read this and wanted to pass along…..

By Tom Dyson- palmbeachletter.com
I wrote this essay for your children and grandchildren.

You’ve probably heard about America’s huge debt load. The U.S. government’s financial obligations now exceed $663,000 per American family. This burden will fall on the youngest Americans.

It’s unethical. It’s unfortunate. But it’s the reality.

With this giant financial obligation bearing down on them, it’s critical that now—right nowyour children and grandchildren learn about money and finance. They need to know the basic principles… like how to be independent, why debt is dangerous, and how to grow money.

They don’t teach finance in schools. If you don’t teach them this knowledge, no one will. They call this financial illiteracy.

If our children are financially illiterate, they have as much chance of survival as a swordsman in a gunfight. There will be no mercy for the financially illiterate in the future. It’s likely these people will live as indentured servants to the government and its creditors.

But if our kids have a grasp of finance and its basics—and they obey its lawsthey will grow up rich. They will be in a position to help other Americans, too.

Below, you’ll find the three vital financial concepts all children need to understand. Please pass them on to your children and grandchildren as soon as you can. I have three young children… And these three concepts are my starting point for their financial education.

First of all, our kids must know that they are not entitled to money or wealth… or anything for that matter, even Christmas presents. They must earn money. I want my children to learn that they shouldn’t expect anything to be handed to them. I don’t want them to rely on the government for their livelihood, like many people do right now.

So many people treat money and prosperity as an entitlement. The government even calls its welfare programs “entitlements.” This word—and what it representsgets stamped into young people’s brains. Kids act as if they are somehow entitled to toys, video games, and cars. But why should they be? Just because they have parents, it doesn’t mean they should get everything they want… or anything at all, for that matter.

I plan to regularly remind my children of this when they are old enough to understand it. And I’m not going to pay my kids an allowance. An allowance would reinforce the sense of entitlement. They can make money by earning it: doing the dishes, making their beds, mowing the lawn… there are a million things. My wife and I will pay them for doing those things. But I’m not going to just give them money.

The second concept our children need to understand is debt. Debt is expensive. If you abuse it, it will destroy you. Like the entitlement mentality, debt is an enslaver. It robs you of your independence. I avoid debt in my personal life… and when I’m choosing investments.

The best way to illustrate the cost of debt is to calculate the total amount of interest the debt generates in dollars over the lifetime of the loan, instead of looking at the interest rate (like most people do). Once you look at it like that, you can see how expensive borrowing money really is.

For example, say you borrow $100,000 with a 30-year mortgage at 7%. Over 30 years, you’ll end up paying $140,000 in interest to the bank. In the end, you’re out $240,000 for a house that cost less than half that. Not a good deal.

The third thing our kids need to learn is the power of compound interest and the best way to harness it.

Compound interest is the most powerful force in finance. It is the force behind almost every fortune. The brilliant Richard Russell calls compound interest “The Royal Road to Riches.” And it’s mathematically guaranteed.

Let’s say, for example, you have $100 earning 10% annual interest. At the end of the  first year, you’ll have $110. During the second year, you’ll earn interest on $110 instead of $100. In the third year, you’ll earn interest on $121… and so on. This is the power of compound interest. The numbers get enormous over time, simply because you’re earning interest on your interest.

 

I really have to hand it to all of you. There is no doubt that you all work incredibly hard to help us hang onto and build up our assets. You clearly spare no effort and hold nothing back. Platinum Level subscriber Bob T.

Because time is the most important element in compounding, it’s an incredibly powerful idea for children to understand. They have the ultimate edge in the market: the time to compound over decades.

The stock market is the best place to earn compound interest. You buy companies that have 50 years or more of rising dividend payments ahead of them. Then you let the mathematics work.

As soon as my kids are old enough to understand some arithmetic, I am going to sit down with the classic compounding tables and show them which stocks they have to buy. I’ll use Coca-Cola, Johnson & Johnson, and Philip Morris as examples.

After that, assuming they have the discipline to follow through, they will get rich. There’s no doubt about it.

In sum, you have the responsibility to educate your kin about finance. If you don’t, no one else will, and they will suffer for it.

Encourage them to work hard and avoid the entitlement mentality. Teach them the power of compound interest and explain the dangers of debt.

If you do this, you will equip your kids and grandkids to survive financially in the difficult circumstances ahead. You’ll provide them with something that nobody can place a price on: the power of independence.

Good investing,

Tom Dyson them, it’s critical that nowright nowyour children and grandchildren learn about money and finance. They need to know the basic principles… like how to be independent, why debt is dangerous, and how to grow money.
They don’t teach finance in schools. If you don’t teach them this knowledge, no one will. They call this financial illiteracy.

If our children are financially illiterate, they have as much chance of survival as a swordsman in a gunfight. There will be no mercy for the financially illiterate in the future. It’s likely these people will live as indentured servants to the government and its creditors.

But if our kids have a grasp of finance and its basics—and they obey its lawsthey will grow up rich. They will be in a position to help other Americans, too.

Below, you’ll find the three vital financial concepts all children need to understand. Please pass them on to your children and grandchildren as soon as you can. I have three young children… And these three concepts are my starting point for their financial education.

First of all, our kids must know that they are not entitled to money or wealth… or anything for that matter, even Christmas presents. They must earn money. I want my children to learn that they shouldn’t expect anything to be handed to them. I don’t want them to rely on the government for their livelihood, like many people do right now.

So many people treat money and prosperity as an entitlement. The government even calls its welfare programs “entitlements.” This word—and what it representsgets stamped into young people’s brains. Kids act as if they are somehow entitled to toys, video games, and cars. But why should they be? Just because they have parents, it doesn’t mean they should get everything they want… or anything at all, for that matter.

I plan to regularly remind my children of this when they are old enough to understand it. And I’m not going to pay my kids an allowance. An allowance would reinforce the sense of entitlement. They can make money by earning it: doing the dishes, making their beds, mowing the lawn… there are a million things. My wife and I will pay them for doing those things. But I’m not going to just give them money.

The second concept our children need to understand is debt. Debt is expensive. If you abuse it, it will destroy you. Like the entitlement mentality, debt is an enslaver. It robs you of your independence. I avoid debt in my personal life… and when I’m choosing investments.

The best way to illustrate the cost of debt is to calculate the total amount of interest the debt generates in dollars over the lifetime of the loan, instead of looking at the interest rate (like most people do). Once you look at it like that, you can see how expensive borrowing money really is.

For example, say you borrow $100,000 with a 30-year mortgage at 7%. Over 30 years, you’ll end up paying $140,000 in interest to the bank. In the end, you’re out $240,000 for a house that cost less than half that. Not a good deal.

The third thing our kids need to learn is the power of compound interest and the best way to harness it.

Compound interest is the most powerful force in finance. It is the force behind almost every fortune. The brilliant Richard Russell calls compound interest “The Royal Road to Riches.” And it’s mathematically guaranteed.

Let’s say, for example, you have $100 earning 10% annual interest. At the end of the  first year, you’ll have $110. During the second year, you’ll earn interest on $110 instead of $100. In the third year, you’ll earn interest on $121… and so on. This is the power of compound interest. The numbers get enormous over time, simply because you’re earning interest on your interest.

 

I really have to hand it to all of you. There is no doubt that you all work incredibly hard to help us hang onto and build up our assets. You clearly spare no effort and hold nothing back. Platinum Level subscriber Bob T.

Because time is the most important element in compounding, it’s an incredibly powerful idea for children to understand. They have the ultimate edge in the market: the time to compound over decades.

The stock market is the best place to earn compound interest. You buy companies that have 50 years or more of rising dividend payments ahead of them. Then you let the mathematics work.

As soon as my kids are old enough to understand some arithmetic, I am going to sit down with the classic compounding tables and show them which stocks they have to buy. I’ll use Coca-Cola, Johnson & Johnson, and Philip Morris as examples.

After that, assuming they have the discipline to follow through, they will get rich. There’s no doubt about it.

In sum, you have the responsibility to educate your kin about finance. If you don’t, no one else will, and they will suffer for it.

Encourage them to work hard and avoid the entitlement mentality. Teach them the power of compound interest and explain the dangers of debt.

If you do this, you will equip your kids and grandkids to survive financially in the difficult circumstances ahead. You’ll provide them with something that nobody can place a price on: the power of independence.

Good investing,

Tom Dyson

Simple Stuff

SimpleStuff

(Simple Stuff is simply a bunch of inspirational, motivational and other quotes meant to make you think, reflect, smile, even laugh a bit. Hopefully helpful, useful stuff….)

 Too many people spend money they haven’t earned to buy things they don’t want to impress people they don’t like. –Will Smith

 

Money is only a tool. It will take you wherever you wish, but it will not replace you as the driver.-Ayn Rand

Our necessities never equal our wants.-Benjamin Franklin

 

It all depends on how we look at things, and not how they are in themselves. –Carl Jung
A man who wants to lead the orchestra must turn his back on the crowd.-Max Lucado

 

Manifest plainness, embrace simplicity, reduce selfishness, have few desires.-Lao Tzu
Boredom: the desire for desires.-Leo Tolstoy

 

Freedom in general may be defined as the absence of obstacles to the realization of desires.-Bertrand Russell

 

Open your eyes, look within. Are you satisfied with the life you’re living?- Bob Marley

 

 

Unrelated Bonus: here is a good book- The King of Sports
Gregg Easterbrook, author of the wildly popular ESPN.com column Tuesday Morning Quarterback takes on football’s place in American society.

Gridiron football is the king of sports – it’s the biggest game in the strongest and richest country in the world. Of the twenty most-watched television broadcasts ever, both in the United States and internationally, all twenty were Super Bowls. In The King of Sports, Easterbrook tells the full story of how football became so deeply ingrained in American culture. Both good and bad, he examines its impact on American society at all levels of the game.

 

A video for laughs

You know I don’t send stuff like this around too often, but this is good… we all need to laugh once in a while….

A lip-sync battle on Jimmy Fallon where they pull out an old Fresh Prince and do Superbass from Nicki Minaj.  …  funny.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4ajQ-foj2Q

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