Monthly Archives: January 2013

Simple Stuff

(SIMPLE STUFF is a short bit of ideas, quotes, phrases, and ‘stuff’ to help you stay focused, stay loose, ask better questions, and laugh a bit.)

Life rewards effort, exponentially. No matter how small the effort, nor how daunting the odds. That’s a lot, –The Universe -www.tut.com Mike Dooley

 “It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly. So that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.” – Teddy Roosevelt

“Experience is not what happens to you; it is what you do with what happens to you.”

~ Aldous Huxley

spacer gif
“When you feel like giving up, remember why you held on for so long in the first place.”

~ Unknown

spacer gif
“When you come to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on. “

~ Franklin D. Roosevelt

spacer gif
“If you’re going through hell, keep going. “

~ Winston Churchill

spacer gif
“I have heard there are troubles of more than one kind.
Some come from ahead and some come from behind.
But I’ve bought a big bat. I’m all ready you see.
Now my troubles are going to have troubles with me!”

~ Dr. Seuss

spacer gif
“Breathe. Let go. And remind yourself that this very moment is the only one you know you have for sure.”

~ Oprah Winfrey

spacer gif

SimpleStuff

your Declaration of Independence

The below is taken from an article/blog on Early to Rise. Craig at ETR wrote it.
I started to quote parts of it but instead thought I would share most of it with you.

FYI, hope it helps.

Step 1: Identify it.

Spend some time thinking about the chasm between where you are and where you should be.

  • What’s been holding you back?
  • Why is it taking longer than you planned?
  • What challenges are proving difficult?
  • Who or what has gotten in your way?
  • What are you really getting annoyed with in your current situation?
  • Do you have any toxic people or things in your life that need to go?

Are you starting to get mad?! Good.

When you get frustrated with yourself and where you are right now, that’s the starting point. Identify exactly what you’re fed up with and what current connections you may need to break.

Step 2: Write it.

There’s serious power in the sheer act of writing something down. More than writing down your goals (which I also advocate), this is making a bold declaration and making it official!

Here’s a suggestion. If you want to have some fun with this, read the first two sentences and the last paragraph of the Declaration of Independence. You’ll get an idea of what I’m talking about.

Mine starts out, “When in the course of my copywriting career, it becomes necessary to dissolve the unprofitable connections and habits I have developed, and to assume among the powers of the earth, my rightful place alongside rising copywriting greats like … ”

Craft some cool language that fits you. No one else has to ever see this, so don’t worry about how it sounds.

Step 3: Frame it!

I’m serious. And put it in a place where you can see it from your desk. We’re talking about a document that’s going to help change the course of your career, right? Make it count!

I did this three years ago when I declared that my loyalty to King George III (my employer) would be ending soon. Somehow stating it and posting it made it real.

Step 4: Use it.

Let your bold declaration, whatever it is, change you.

First, you identify it. Then you write it out. Then you post it.

Now stake your claim on the new territory and move in.

What next?

Think of your Declaration of Independence as a starting point, a launching pad, not a goal to be achieved.

Let it be a daily reminder that you got to a point where you had to change course.

I can tell you this. When you’ve formally made a declaration, even just to yourself, things naturally start falling into place.

Then, in the words of Thomas Jefferson: ACT

Habits

OK, New Year 2013 is here and many people have made resolutions. (also many have already broken those resolutions)

I have had a tough time in life breaking bad habits and making new ones. But once in a while I’d almost immediately stop doing something, break a habit and/or build a good habit almost overnight – but I didn’t know how or why.

For a long time, probably like some of you, I kept trying to change some of my habits — eating healthier, waking earlier, writing, exercising, getting out of debt, other things about dreams and life — and I kept having a very tough time breaking the bad and starting the new.

In retrospect, I now know that I approached things in the wrong way. Many of us set ourselves up for failure, and that’s what I was doing. One could say that I was ‘building a habit of failing at habits’.

I recently read a great blog about  changing habits and here is a helpful excerpt. It is written by Leo Babauta is the owner of ZenHabits.net.

“How to Fail at Habits

I failed at creating new habits repeatedly. Here’s what I did, and what most people also do:

  1. Take on multiple habits at once. We have lots of things we want to change, so we try to change them all at once. Of course, this spreads our focus and energy thin, so that we can’t give our entire focus to any one habit. Habits are hard to change, and spreading yourself thin is a good way to make sure you fail.
  2. Bite off more than you can chew. Whether you do one habit or many at a time, try to do as much with each habit as possible, so that it takes up a lot of energy and seems really hard. Don’t run for 5 minutes, try doing 30. That way it’ll be a big chunk of your day that will get pushed to tomorrow when other urgent things come up, it will take a lot of your physical and mental energy, and it’ll be something you dread doing because it’s so difficult. Don’t meditate for 5 minutes, meditate for 60. Do 90 minutes of yoga. Change your entire diet all at once. These are excellent ways to fail.
  3. Tackle habits you don’t enjoy. Because habits should be something you do for moral reasons — they’re good for you! And so it doesn’t matter if you hate them, and if you dread doing them after awhile, because you’re going to be disciplined. That works extremely seldomly, so it’s a great strategy.
  4. Keep it a secret. Don’t tell anyone you’re changing your habit. That way, if you mess up, it won’t be embarrassing. This means that you secretly think you’re going to mess up, which is another excellent way to fail.
  5. Jump right into it. Decide today to start running, and just do it! This way you are treating it as if it’s nothing, and not a big commitment. You don’t plan for obstacles, don’t set up a support system, don’t give yourself rewards, and treat the habit change as lightly as you do putting on your socks. And when you quit doing the habit, it will be no problem either.
  6. Don’t worry about how others have succeeded. Why read the success stories of other people? You know better than them. You can do it without learning from them. That’s what I used to think, at least.
  7. Don’t motivate yourself. You don’t need motivation if you have discipline. Discipline is something you have or don’t have, but motivation is something you can actually do.
  8. Give yourself plenty of opportunities to give up. Trying to eat healthy? Have your cupboards and fridge filled with junk food, and have it surround you at work, and go to restaurants filled with fried foods and sugary sweets. You’ll definitely have the discipline to ignore those.

The eight steps above are a sure-fire recipe for habit failure, and I recommend you try all of them if you’re looking to fail. Of course, if you’re looking to succeed, you might want to avoid them and possibly try the opposite.”

Another great resource is the book ‘The Power of Habits” (charlesduhigg.com) . Great insight and studies how we build habits; individually and as a large organization. Great examples, stories, etc.

I also wrote a blog about the book and habits with some good ideas at http://wp.me/p2mGFu-3r

.

Words To Live By: Decisions and Decisiveness

More than anything else, I believe it’s our decisions, not the conditions of our lives that determine our destiny. You and I both know that there are people who were born with advantages…  Yet you and I also know that we constantly meet, read and hear about people who against all odds have exploded beyond the limitations of their conditions by making new decisions about what to do with their lives.  They’ve become examples of the unlimited power of the human spirit.” — Awaken the Giant Within, page 33
.
Decisions

I believe making reasonably fast decisions are necessary for life, for business, and simple everyday things. So many times I see people struggle with a decision. Many times the decision is something so simple and easy, yet they don’t trust themselves, fear the unknown, fear change, or somehow just don’t want to pull the trigger.

I am the first to agree that making a decision can be important, life changing and one needs to think about the facts. It is true that we should not make a ‘knee-jerk’ reaction. However, too many of us put off decisions, or simply don’t make them at all. First of all, sometimes we don’t have time to go get more fact. Second, many times we have all the information that we need, it is our emotions that are holding us back.

Decision making has a lot to do with self confidence, self esteem, faith in ourselves and others, and simply the ability to make a decision and let go. We’ve all struggled with it.

I recall a former boss of mine. We’d be in a meeting and we’d discuss something and he had all the facts. It would come time to make a decision. He wanted to think about it. I would push him to decide there in the meeting – or at least talk about his reservations there. He almost always wanted to ‘think about it’. Often weeks went by and no action. We’d meet again and he’d say ‘I’m still thinking about it.’ Typically he’d eventually decide not to do it, and I believe that under it all he was a fearful guy. He is a talented, smart person but his personality and focus was on the negative, what could go wrong, bad things, etc. He’d look at a situation and instantly tell you 5 ways it could go wrong – and actually get you really scared about it. Meanwhile it was a new opportunity and presented lots of good things. I’d often have to ‘shake it off’ and look at it my way. We missed so many opportunities waiting for his decision process. I always tried to help him and point it out in a nice way, suggest a ‘due date’ for the decision, etc. I believe he just was scared, under it all. I did feel for him.

Executives, parents, adults need to have faith in themselves and make a decision. It doesn’t mean that they can’t change their mind later if new information comes up. It also doesn’t mean that we won’t make mistakes or fail. But a quick firm decision seems to go with nature and the flow of the world. We don’t see a lion contemplating if she should chase the antelope or not, or if she should wait until the next group comes, or if she should pick this one or that. She sees the opportunity, quickly weighs the factors, and goes for it. In the heat of it all, she may have to change her target from one to another, but so be it.

“The ability to make a decision, act on that decision and keep to it is fundamental for a business person to be successful.”   This was said by Andrew Carnegie, the great U.S. steel tycoon. In fact, he went further and said that any person that couldn’t make a decision in a timely manner when all the facts were evident was someone not to be trusted, since they wouldn’t have the strength of character to see through the commitments required by any decision.

When your values are clear to you, making decisions becomes easier. -Roy E. Disney

Here’s some thoughts from a website called www.actioncoach.com

Procrastination over decisions is fatal for a business owner as decisions come before actions and the right actions lead to the desired outcomes. Sometimes, though, the right decision isn’t all that obvious and how to get to that decision isn’t all that easy for some people. So it’s worth exploring a number of ways to help and below are a number of ways to approach decision making.

1. Basic Pros and Cons: This is the simplest method. Draw a line down the middle of a piece of paper and on the right write down the reasons for doing something and on the left the reasons against. Sometimes just doing this adds clarity, especially if done with another person to brainstorm all the factors.

2. List outcomes from decision and rank importance: Draw a basic grid and down the left and write down the desired outcomes you’re looking to achieve from making a decision. Then rank them 1-5 on how much of an impact the decision is likely to have. This helps you see how much the decision will assist with your goals.

3. Comparison Matrix: Draw a grid. Across the top, write down the different decisions to make i.e. which product to make or which supplier to choose. On the left, list the different outcomes desired. Then against each write a score 1-5 against each column. Again this adds clarity to making choices between alternative decisions and it’s especially useful when there are trade-offs to be made. The use of this matrix method is very effective in marketing when looking at different products or markets to go to versus the companies list of core competencies.

 The key is that decisions have to be made on a constant basis.

 It doesn’t matter which side of the fence you get off on sometimes. What matters most is getting off. You cannot make progress without making decisions.Jim Rohn

The following is actually from the website www.sba.gov.

  • Define, as specifically as possible, what the decision is that needs to be made. Is this really your decision or someone else’s? Do you really need to make a decision? (If you do not have at least two options, there is no decision to be made.) When does the decision need to be made? Why is this decision important to you?
  • Brainstorm, and write down as many alternatives as you can think of. Be sure to use your resources (experienced friends and family, the Internet, etc.) to find out more about the implications of each option.
  • Visualize the outcome of each alternative. Do you feel more satisfied with one outcome than with the others?
  • Do a reality check. Cross off those alternatives that most likely will not occur.
  • Once you have made your decision, get moving on it. Worrying or second-guessing yourself will only cause stress. You have done your very best. Remember, no decision is set in stone!

From the SBA website (above)

  •  A lot of times I want to just tell people, ‘Calm down, take a breath. Stay relaxed and listen to yourself for a moment. Listen to your head, your heart, and your gut. You know your decision, just go with it.” Many times we get caught in the emotions, outside noise, other people’s opinions, media, society, etc. We need to just go to the quiet place inside us for a moment and listen. http://www.onewebstrategy.com

You can also reference a short blog I recently wrote about “How to Make Decisions” where I discuss using the Linear Model and a simple rating system and basic matrix. It is very easy and useable for almost any decision – buying a car/home, planning a vacation, deciding what to do this weekend, etc. You can read it here… https://onewebstrategy.wordpress.com/2013/01/08/how-to-make-a-…t-any-decision/

In any moment of decision, the best thing you can do is the right thing, the next best thing is the wrong thing, and the worst thing you can do is nothing.
Theodore Roosevelt

 

Thanks.

.

A different view on visualization

You may know that I’m a big fan of visualization.

I do have trouble being consistent and doing it ‘well’ but I believe it works.

Here is a copy of an email I received and I wanted to share. FYI ONLY, I have not yet read the book. THis is not an affiliate link.

While other people’s New Year’s resolutions are dying
at the stake approaching the 2 week mark,
here is something awesome for you to try.They are called Dream Doodles.In my book, Dreams DOodle Come True,
I discuss the importance of having an image
in your minds eye to focus on like a roadmap for success.Try visualizing this cartoon happening to you!

Interesting Image
When you worry, you visualize bad things happening to you.
This approach is the opposite, called success worrying.
Yes, this is a form of visualization.I’ve combined “success worrying” with cartooning
in the above Dream Doodle. The act of peppering your mind with the
images you want to bring to life for you and your family.SO instead of focusing on all the debt you may have.
Why not focus on what you want in your life.This illustration was drawn by a guy very deep
in debt just a couple years ago. He sat down in the midst
of creditors haggling him immersed in self doubt and afraid
to take a stroll out to the mailbox in fear of
what late bill would surface next.

He drafted an image of having so much money and not knowing what
to do with it.

Just a short while later, he situation began to turn.
The funny thing is when you are in that state of
mind, it seems as if it will never end.
Looking back it was a blip on the radar screen.

Yes, that guy was me. And yes, it will be you too!

This email is an example of
the inspiration I plan to share over the next year
using Dream Doodles and other cartoons to get
your wheelhouse turning on the possibilities that
exist in bolstering your business.

A little inspiration mixed with all the wonderful ways
cartoon marketing helps your business thrive and grow
in a challenging market.

Vincent Palko
vpalko@adtoons.com

Twitter?

Please feel free to connect to me on Twitter…and pass it along too?

https://twitter.com/OnewebStrategy

twitter2

Simple Stuff

(SIMPLE STUFF is a short bit of ideas, quotes, phrases, and ‘stuff’ to help you stay focused, stay loose, ask better questions, and laugh a bit.) SimpleStuff

Gun control? We need bullet control! I think every bullet should cost 5,000 dollars. Because if a bullet cost five thousand dollar, we wouldn’t have any innocent bystanders. – CHRIS ROCK
.

Working for someone else gives you little chance to make a fortune. By owning your own business, you only have to be good to become wealthy.” – Kekich Credo #25

 When giving careful and calculated thought on how else you might see certain situations differently than you now see them – including your entire life, for that matter – please keep in mind, that occasionally being on “the fringe,” is good.
Real good.     The Universe (tut.com / Mike Dooley)

.

I went to a bookstore and asked the saleswoman, “Where’s the self-help section?” She said if she told me, it would defeat the purpose.  -George Carlin
.
Pessimism and skepticism are just code words for “I don’t want to be disappointed again.” If you don’t get your hopes up about what you want or if you don’t put your entire focus and emotion in the direction of what you want in life, you are going to miss out on all that you desire and deserve. You must learn to see things as they are. -Tony Robbins
.
I think we’re put here to spread more joy to our fellow man while working to reduce suffering.And if you focus on that, chances are you’ll live a rich and fulfilled life.
%d bloggers like this: