Frey Freyday – Perseverance

(Frey Freyday is simply a bunch of inspirational, motivational and other quotes meant to make you think, reflect, smile, even laugh a bit. Hopefully helpful, useful stuff….)

 Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and above all confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something and that this thing must be attained. Marie Curie

Word to Live By:

perseverance-[ˌpərsəˈvirəns] NOUN -persistence in doing something despite difficulty or delay in achieving success.

 So these are very unusual times, right?

We can complain, we can get upset. We can make other choices too.

We must persevere. We must continue, improve, do better, make it work, ask for help, offer help, make an effort, have faith and keep going.

Just keep swimming…..

Many years ago I was in a job that I didn’t like with a person who was hostile and difficult. Finances were tight. I wanted out of that job. I was often concerned and depressed. For about 1 or 2 weeks, I just coasted. I didn’t really work hard and I ‘vegged out’. Then I spoke with a few older, wiser guys and they both told me to ‘keep swinging’. They were right. I went back and put forth 100% effort, worked hard, regardless of the circumstances. It was at that time that I started to look for quotes, like the above quote. I shared them with a few people and they liked it. So I routinely sent out what I then called, “Simple Stuff” – a prelude to the Frey Freyday. This kept my mind focused and more upbeat. Soon the upbeat attitude and full effort actually got me a better job. It also built a habit of putting forth 100% effort and looking for inspiration and ‘good stuff’ in the world.

Perseverance is passion and perseverance for very long-term goals. Perseverance is having stamina. Perseverance is sticking with your future, day in, day out, not just for the week, not just for the month, but for years, and working really hard to make that future a reality. Perseverance is living life like it’s a marathon, not a sprint.

The uncertainty we face now is tough for some. For some there is certainty that things will indeed get harder, at least in the short term. Should we go quietly into that good night? No. Give it your best 100% effort, look for good, and give value to others.


Frankly, in general, I am encouraged by what I see in the U.S. – People are being kind, people are making it work, they are trying to stay upbeat, stay healthy and trying to keep moving ahead.

We are persevering together!

“Trust the wait. Embrace the uncertainty. Enjoy the beauty of becoming.                             When nothing is certain, anything is possible”      – Mandy Hale

Frey Freyday was actually born out of something I created called “Words To Live By” (WTLB). Going forward, I will now not only share the quotes, as you may be used to receiving, but also a related (WTLB). In 1999, when we had our first daughter, I was contemplating how I would raise my new beautiful child, and I was thinking about how I can best educate her and my other children about values, morals, and other key thoughts about life. School offers education. Religion offers some values and morals. Parents offer most of it, sometimes intentionally, sometimes accidentally.

So I created a (WTLB) book, like a dictionary, which lists things like honesty, love, persistence, etc. with a definition that I created, with my wife’s input. I then turned it into a workbook with one word per page and space below for notes. For years we would discuss with my two daughters and they would draw pictures and make notes in the blank space. I may share some of those images with you. As they got older, they were less inclined to draw and more open to quotes and references from adults, hence where Frey Freyday came from….

You can read more at www.onewebstrategy.com

See the source image

Trillion – what is it?

So, at this moment, many Americans are waiting to see if Congress can come through with a stimulus package; it is rumored to be up to, perhaps over, $2 trillion dollars.

What is that number, trillion? What does that mean?

1,000,000,000,000 (12 zeroes, 4 commas)
or 1012 (ten to the twelfth power)
a number equal to 1,000 times one billion
one thousand billion

How Long Ago Is a Trillion Seconds?

If you count backward, then:
1 million seconds = 12 days ago
1 billion seconds = 31 years ago
1 trillion seconds = 30,000 B.C.

How high is a trillion in $1000 bills?

If you stack a trillion-worth of $1000 bills together, then:
1 million dollars = 4 inches high
1 billion dollars = 364 feet high
1 trillion dollars = 63 miles high
(give or take a foot or two)
Note that this is a STACK, not laid end-to-end.

Let’s Measure a Trillion in Money

With about 305,000,000 people and 111,000,000 households in the U.S.

$1 Million is 1¢ per household,
$1 Billion is $3.28 per person and $9 per household,
$1 Trillion is $3,280 per person and $9,000 per household

If a person’s salary is $40,000 per year it would take:

25 years to earn $1 Million
25 Thousand years to earn $1 Billion,
25 Million years to earn $1 Trillion

 If you lived to be 80 years of age, to have:

$1 Million you would have to save $34 each day of your life,
$1 Billion you would have to save $34,000 each day of your life,
$1 Trillion you would have to save $34 Million each day of your life

One year of clock time = (60sec/min) x (60 min/hr) x (24 hr/da) x (365.25 da) = 3.16 x 107 sec

One trillion seconds of ordinary clock time = ( 1012 sec)/( 3.16 x 107 sec/yr) = 31,546 years!

Six trillion seconds equals 189,276 years. Now, as an aside, along with the nearly six trillion miles in the light-year, you might be interested to know that there are nearly five trillion dollars in the current U.S. national debt. Is it any wonder that our politicians in Washington are concerned?

(An interesting bit of trivia: If one were to count the national Debt at the rate of one dollar per second, he or she would have to use a mechanical counter to click off the digits. Why? Because, if he or she counted in the usual way, saying “one, two, three, …” etc., there would be numbers whose names are so large, that it would take more than a second of clock time to pronounce them. For example: “Nine hundred and ninety nine billion, nine hundred and ninety nine million, nine hundred and ninety nine thousand, nine hundred and ninety nine,” takes about 8 seconds to pronounce.)

How much is a trillion dollars?

Fear vs. Reality – Coronavirus

A must read from Peter Diamandis about the facts around the Coronavirus.

Over the past week, our amygdalas (the fear centers of our brain) have been in overdrive.

As Coronavirus (and anxiety) spread, I’m concerned by the level of pandemic fear circulating through our news and social media.

The goal of this blog is to give you a thoughtful alternative to fear… to contextualize what you are hearing…

Let’s talk about death rates… While this is no apples-to-apples comparison, how we react to death is primal. And when we hear about Coronavirus-induced deaths, we go on red alert. But allow me to contextualize the numbers for you.

(Disclaimer: The below compared populations are different (China vs. world), and infectious diseases do not maintain a consistent daily average. But the point still stands…)

On one of the worst days for Coronavirus in China (February 10, 2020), 108 people died. But on a given day, globally:

  • 26,283 people die of cancer;
  • 49,041 people die of cardiovascular diseases;
  • 4,383 people die of diabetes.

Meanwhile, suicide takes on average 2,191 lives….

Mosquitoes take the lives of over 2,740 people, and….

And HUMANS kill an average of 1,287 fellow people, every single day.

In response, this blog covers two key takeaways:

(1) The hard numbers to help you decide: Should I travel? Do I overstock my pantry? And is the world coming to an end? Let’s look at the data on how Coronavirus compares to typical influenza (the “flu”). (SPOILER ALERT: we’re seeing over 1000X more deaths from the regular flu, as of early March.)

(2) A brilliant blog on the realities of Coronavirus by Dr. Paul Sax, a Harvard Medical School classmate of mine (now Professor at our mutual alma mater), who serves as clinical director of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. His blog is brilliant. Read it. Share it.

Let’s dive in.

Part 1: The Numbers… Let’s look at the data

COVID-19 has come out of left field and left us blindsided.

But people are largely fearful because we don’t understand it.

So let’s look first at the numbers.

During the 2017-2018 flu season, CDC figures put U.S. influenza deaths at roughly 80,000. Meanwhile, global estimates indicated anywhere between 290,000 – 650,000 influenza-associated deaths from respiratory causes alone.

And in terms of deaths from influenza-induced lower respiratory tract infections, a 2019 study estimated 99,000 – 200,000 deaths for the 2017-2018 flu season.

The following year, CDC figures estimated 35.5 million Americans fell ill with influenza, resulting in 490,600 hospitalizations and 34,200 deaths.

And since this past October, the regular influenza has infected as many as 49 million and killed between 20,000 – 52,000 in the U.S. alone.

By comparison on a global scale, the Coronavirus outbreak has infected over 90,000 people as of early March, resulting in 3,462 deaths worldwide (today’s stat).

While the fatality rate of Coronavirus now appears to be slightly higher than that of typical influenza (estimates range from 1.4% to the WHO’s 3.4%), the toll of the common flu is staggeringly higher than that of COVID-19.

Concern—as with any infectious disease—is warranted, yes.

But knowing the numbers helps limit our fear of the unknown, and battle our amygdalas against irrationality.

These figures are not to suggest we should live without precaution. Regardless of how willing you are to sacrifice enjoyment for safety, it’s critical to understand expert concerns and how to mitigate them.

How much risk are you willing to take? What are you willing to sacrifice in everyday enjoyment and carefree living? And should you really be hoarding toilet paper?

This is the blog that I have shared with my family and friends and hope it is useful to you:

Part 2: Infectious Disease Doctor: What Does (And Doesn’t) Scare Me About The Coronavirus

By Dr. Paul Sax, Harvard Medical School

Being a specialist in infectious diseases right now is an interesting experience.

Added to the usual challenges of our everyday practice — caring for people receiving transplants or chemotherapy, those with HIV, surgical infections, tropical diseases and others — we now must manage a deluge of coronavirus-related questions from friends, family and colleagues.

Here are a few recent examples in bold, along with my responses.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: My baby has a pediatrician’s appointment next week, and the doctor’s office is right next to the hospital. Is it safe to go?

A: Yes.

Q: Should I wear a mask while commuting to work on the T or other public transit?

A: Only if you’re sick yourself, because the mask will protect others. Otherwise masks probably don’t do anything to protect you. Here’s what you should do: Wash your hands!

Q: I’ve had a trip planned for a year to Australia and New Zealand and am supposed to leave in early April — should I cancel now and get a partial refund?

A: Only cancel if the anxiety of going would make you not enjoy the trip.

Q: I’m just back from France and have a bad cough, sore throat and a chill. How do I know if it’s the flu or coronavirus?

A: We really can’t tell. Reach out to your doctor and see about getting tested for both.

Q: Should I avoid Corona beer?

A: There’s no coronavirus-linked reason to pass on Corona beer — but in my opinion, it’s not very tasty.

OK, so my friends, family and colleagues haven’t really asked about that last one — but it is a thing.

Now, there was one actual question that caught me off guard: “What are you afraid of?”

Before responding, let me acknowledge that I am by nature an optimistic person — my family even gave me a T-shirt with the words “half full.”

Plus, we infectious diseases specialists are, by our very training and clinical activities, repeatedly handling situations that would make others uncomfortable — such as treating patients with anthrax, SARS, MERS, West Nile, H1N1 influenza, Zika and Ebola in the last 20 years alone.

But several aspects of this incipient pandemic cause me great concern.

5 Big Concerns

(1) Our health care system does not have “surge” capacity. This is especially true during flu season, when many hospitals run at nearly full capacity. Adding a high volume of patients with respiratory infections — all of whom would require private rooms — will severely strain most institutions. It will further block other important hospital activities, such as elective surgeries and transfers from other hospitals. This is already happening in northern Italy.

(2) Here in the U.S., testing for the new coronavirus was initially sharply limited. For a variety of reasons — misguided policy, regulatory limitations and faulty tests — we only recently started broad testing for coronavirus among people with compatible symptoms — some two months after the disease was first reported. (Initially, only those who had traveled to regions with coronavirus outbreaks were eligible for testing.) While other countries have already conducted thousands or even tens of thousands of tests, as of last week the U.S. had done fewer than 500. While the logjam on testing should end soon, it’s probably too late to prevent extensive community transmission.

(3) The people at greatest risk for severe or fatal coronavirus illness are already our most vulnerable patients. Like other viral respiratory tract infections — flu, respiratory syncytial virus, even rhinovirus (cause of the common cold) — older age and concurrent medical problems make coronavirus infection much more serious. Estimates from China suggest the mortality rate among those older than 80 is 15%. That’s why the reported identification of cases in a Washington nursing home is particularly worrisome.

(4) Hoarding of masks and other protective equipment could stress the supply chain, putting health care workers at risk. All of us in health care accept that exposure to infection is part of our job. But to do so without the appropriate protective supplies cannot be permitted. It is critical that we have access to the specialized N95 masks and other gear, especially during procedures that increase the risk of exposure.

(5) Political pressures might make it difficult for public health officials to tell the truth. Does Dr. Anthony Fauci — longtime director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and someone who has navigated outbreaks for decades — really need to have his statements cleared by Vice President Mike Pence? When Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, said a global pandemic was highly likely, only to be contradicted later that day by the president, who should we believe? The Trump administration on Saturday denied muzzling public health officials, but I find these examples troubling.

3 Important Reasons For Optimism

If that list seems like a lot to worry about, let me mention a few things I’m not worried about — and that even give me hope.

(1) We know the disease is mild in most people who get it. At least 80%, most likely more, won’t have an illness bad enough to warrant hospitalization. We’ll have a better idea once testing is more broadly applied, but it would not surprise me if the widely cited case fatality rate of 1-2% is eventually less than half that.

(2) Children seem particularly protected from severe coronavirus disease. Many of the sniffles and colds kids experience are due to existing milder coronavirus strains, possibly giving them partial immunity to this more serious new threat.

(3) There has been extraordinary global cooperation from doctors, scientists and public health officials. In most cases, this has included remarkable sharing of clinical data and research. It is wonderful to see the medical community responding in such a unified voice, all of us trying to solve this new problem.

Guess I can still wear my “half full” T-shirt.

© PHD Ventures, 800 Corporate Pointe, Culver City, California, 90230, United States

Frey Freyday-Grit

(Frey Freyday is simply a bunch of inspirational, motivational and other quotes meant to make you think, reflect, smile, even laugh a bit. Hopefully helpful, useful stuff..)

I can’t think of anyone I admire who isn’t fuelled by self-doubt. It’s an essential ingredient. It’s the grit in the oyster. –Richard Eyre

It was proposed that individuals who possess a drive to tirelessly work through challenges, failures, and adversity to achieve set goals and are uniquely positioned to reach higher achievements than others who lack similar stamina. – Angela Duckworth

WORD TO LIVE BY:

GRIT – courage and resolve; strength of character.

 

In our day to day world, whether it is simply something with our job, our health, the economy, a loved one’s challenge – we all face different forms of adversity, failures, challenges, resistance, etc. It happens to all of us in different ways.

We can choose to step back and just avoid the challenge/resistance/effort needed, or we can gather up our grit and continue towards our goals.

So many people have good ideas, intelligence, good intentions, etc. So many people are created and gifted. But that alone doesn’t matter.

Grit. This is the thing that keeps you going back. We go back and find a different way. We learn from our mistakes. We do better, smarter, harder. We preserve. We keep swinging.

Humans do it all the time. The U.S. has a spirit of grit, the country was built on it. There is grit at the family level; parents trying to do better. Individuals trying to succeed, give back, grow, contribute, help others and follow their dreams. One step at a time, even if you just got pushed back 3 steps.

Frey Freyday was actually born out of something I created called “Words To Live By” (WTLB). Going forward, I will now not only share the quotes, as you may be used to receiving, but also a related (WTLB). In 1999, when we had our first daughter, I was contemplating how I would raise my new beautiful child, and I was thinking about how I can best educate her and my other children about values, morals, and other key thoughts about life. School offers education. Religion offers some values and morals. Parents offer most of it, sometimes intentionally, sometimes accidentally.

So I created a (WTLB) book, like a dictionary, which lists things like honesty, love, persistence, etc. with a definition that I created, with my wife’s input. I then turned it into a workbook with one word per page and space below for notes. For years we would discuss with my two daughters and they would draw pictures and make notes in the blank space. I may share some of those images with you. As they got older, they were less inclined to draw and more open to quotes and references from adults, hence where Frey Freyday came from….

You can read more at www.onewebstrategy.com

TED TALK:

Leaving a high-flying job in consulting, Angela Lee Duckworth took a job teaching math to seventh graders in a New York public school. She quickly realized that IQ wasn’t the only thing separating the successful students from those who struggled. Here, she explains her theory of “grit” as a predictor of success.

http://www.ted.com/talks/angela_lee_duckworth_the_key_to_success_grit

Frey Freyday – Agape Love

(Frey Freyday is simply a bunch of inspirational, motivational and other quotes meant to make you think, reflect, smile, even laugh a bit. Hopefully helpful, useful stuff….)

Agape, the love of each one of us for the other, from the closest to the furthest, is in fact the only way that Jesus has given us to find the way of salvation and of the Beatitudes. Pope Francis

WORD TO LIVE BY:

Agape Love – a universal, unconditional love that transcends and persists regardless of circumstance. It goes beyond just the emotions to the extent of seeking the best for others.

A few years ago my oldest daughter went to be a mentor at a camp. She came back with some great experiences and lessons – some of which I benefited. While I heard the term before, my daughter was excited to tell us about and discuss ‘Agape love’.

She learned about how Agape love is different from romantic love, even slightly different from brotherly love. It is an altruistic form of love, “the highest form of love, charity”

Again, did I learn that before? Yes. Do I think about that or apply that to my life? Not nearly often enough.

At camp she mentored a younger person and helped her overcome some fears. Their goals and tasks at the camp were to help, support and show Agape love to their mentees. It was a great experience for them all. Consequently, when she helped the younger mentee with her fears, it helped my daughter work through some of her own fears.

In the media and world today, it is easy to get bombarded with many thoughts that are contrary to Agape love. We need more Agape love in this world. The first step is to be aware, then share it, then introduce it into daily life, use it and set an example.

Some examples include:

  • Chiaune Sugihara-the Japanese envoy to Germany during WW2, who helped thousands of Jews escape Nazi Germany.
  • The Ten Boom Family of “The Hiding Place” fame.
  • The gym teacher in the recent Florida school massacre, who shielded his students with his own body (and was killed for his trouble).
  • The male passenger in a jet/river crash in the 1990′s, who passed the rescue harness to 3 other victims
  • But it doesn’t have to be a big, dramatic act. Many people tirelessly give and love each and everyday in small incremental ways, which we all can do.
  • The below link for a TED talk goes deeper into this and other types of love.

 

Today is Valentine’s Day – mostly associated with romantic love – which is important and also much needed. But I think the world can benefit from a reminder about Agape Love.

 

Frey Freyday was actually born out of something I created called “Words To Live By” (WTLB). Going forward, I will now not only share the quotes, as you may be used to receiving, but also a related (WTLB). In 1999, when we had our first daughter, I was contemplating how I would raise my new beautiful child, and I was thinking about how I can best educate her and my other children about values, morals, and other key thoughts about life. School offers education. Religion offers some values and morals. Parents offer most of it, sometimes intentionally, sometimes accidentally.

So I created a (WTLB) book, like a dictionary, which lists things like honesty, love, persistence, etc. with a definition that I created, with my wife’s input. I then turned it into a workbook with one word per page and space below for notes. For years we would discuss with my two daughters and they would draw pictures and make notes in the blank space. I may share some of those images with you. As they got older, they were less inclined to draw and more open to quotes and references from adults, hence where Frey Freyday came from….

You can read more at www.onewebstrategy.com

BONUS  :   TED TALK

the seven types of love?
philia (deep friendship)
ludus (playful love)
agape (selfless love)
eros (physical love)
storge (familial love)
pragma (long-standing love)
philautia (love of oneself)

https://www.ted.com/tedx/events/11217

Frey Freyday – Meaning

(Frey Freyday is simply a bunch of inspirational, motivational and other quotes meant to make you think, reflect, smile, even laugh a bit. Hopefully helpful, useful stuff….)

I have always believed, and I still believe, that whatever good or bad fortune may come our way we can always give it meaning and transform it into something of value. Hermann Hesse

For the meaning of life differs from man to man, from day to day and from hour to hour. What matters, therefore, is not the meaning of life in general but rather the specific meaning of a person’s life at a given moment. Viktor E. Frankl

WORD TO LIVE BY:

Meaning – [mee-nin]- the end, purpose, or significance of something

Lots of things ‘happen to us’ in life. Illness, loss, death, pain sorrow. There are also lots of events each day that come our way, small and big; traffic, business, bills, and other responsibilities.

Events happen, things happen, how we react to these things is a big deal. The meaning we give to these things makes a difference.

Sometimes we label an event as bad or good. Sometimes that’s not really fair or accurate. Often we need time and perspective to look back on things in our lives. Sometimes that thing that happened seemed like a bad thing for us but after all, it turned out to be good for us.

Recently author Jim Fortin wrote, “There is a personal development program called Landmark Forum and a famous phrase in that program is that “humans are meaning-making machines”. Your brain makes meaning of the world around you for survival purposes and it is entirely brain-based.
People are also making meaning and interpretations about you, what you drive, your ethnicity, your name, where you live, and they’re making judgments which are nothing more than meanings. Many times these meanings are not accurate. It’s simply people just making meanings because that’s what people do. “

Put simply, it isn’t the events, situations, or circumstances of our lives that shape us, but our beliefs as to what those events mean….it is the meaning we assign to the event that makes the difference.

So if you’re going to make meanings in life, what I strongly suggest is that you make meanings that actually serve and build you, as opposed to meanings that actually pull you back. Remember: Nothing has any meaning except the meaning you give it

 

Frey Freyday was actually born out of something I created called “Words To Live By” (WTLB). Going forward, I will now not only share the quotes, as you may be used to receiving, but also a related (WTLB). In 1999, when we had our first daughter, I was contemplating how I would raise my new beautiful child, and I was thinking about how I can best educate her and my other children about values, morals, and other key thoughts about life. School offers education. Religion offers some values and morals. Parents offer most of it, sometimes intentionally, sometimes accidentally.

So I created a (WTLB) book, like a dictionary, which lists things like honesty, love, persistence, etc. with a definition that I created, with my wife’s input. I then turned it into a workbook with one word per page and space below for notes. For years we would discuss with my two daughters and they would draw pictures and make notes in the blank space. I may share some of those images with you. As they got older, they were less inclined to draw and more open to quotes and references from adults, hence where Frey Freyday came from….

You can read more at www.onewebstrategy.com

BONUS  :   Podcast

https://www.jimfortin.com/episode-91-your-life-has-no-meaning-except/

Frey Freyday – Compassion

(Frey Freyday is simply a bunch of inspirational, motivational and other quotes meant to make you think, reflect, smile, even laugh a bit. Hopefully helpful, useful stuff….)

 –com·pas·sion \kəm-ˈpa-shən\ – a feeling of wanting to help some other person or being

The purpose of human life is to serve, and to show compassion and the will to help others.-Albert Schweitzer


Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them humanity cannot survive. If you want others to be happy, practice compassion. If you want to be happy, practice compassion.-Dalai Lama


I have just three things to teach: simplicity, patience, compassion. These three are your greatest treasures.-Lao Tzu


WORD TO LIVE BY:

com·pas·sion –

This was shared last year but worth sharing again…

First, all great religions talk about compassion. The more we mature individually and/or as a species, the more compassionate we become.

There is another definition out there that states “Compassion motivates people to go out of their way to help physical, spiritual, or emotional hurts or pains of another. Compassion is often regarded as having an emotional aspect to it, though when based on cerebral notions such as fairness, justice and interdependence, it may be considered rational in nature and its application understood as an activity based on sound judgment.” This is true. Even though compassion and the act of it often makes us feel better and involved emotion, the benefits can truly be rational and pragmatic.

Compassion is part of altruism – loving and giving unconditionally. As we strive to become better people we must take steps to become more altruistic, which of course means we can act more compassionate.

There are scientific, medical, and psychological studies that show how compassion actually benefits the given and the receiver. Studies have shown that when I am compassionate to another, I benefit; the receiver benefits, and even those people that observe the act benefit. Compassion may have the ability to induce feelings of kindness and forgiveness, which could give people the ability to stop situations that occasionally lead to violence.

Identifying with another person is an essential process for human beings. It is commonly seen throughout the world as people adapt and change with new styles of clothing, language, behavior, etc., which is illustrated by infants who begin to mirror the facial expressions and body movements of their mother as early as the first days of their lives. This process is highly related to compassion because sympathizing with others is possible with people from other countries, cultures, locations, etc

Compassion is a number of things – helping others in need, relieving stress/strife/pain/hurt. Compassion is a process of connecting by identifying with another person.

 Today I was reminded again of compassion in an article. The article did cite a quote from author Kari Kampakis. It beautifully describes the concept of using people’s hurtful actions as opportunities for self-growth and compassion. She writes:

“Regardless of how anyone treats you, you stand to benefit. While some people teach you who you do want to be, others teach you who you don’t want to be. And it’s the people who teach you who you don’t want to be that provide some of the most lasting and memorable lessons on social graces, human dignity, and the importance of acting with integrity.”

Sometimes when we experience unkind treatment from others in the world, we can choose to withdraw, feel hurt, feel angry, etc. Or we can use it as a reminder or opportunity, and it can become a means to gain awareness, compassion, and connection.

(the 2020 challenge is to use 3 quotes or less, what do you think?)

Frey Freyday was actually born out of something I created called “Words To Live By” (WTLB). Going forward, I will now not only share the quotes, as you may be used to receiving, but also a related (WTLB). In 1999, when we had our first daughter, I was contemplating how I would raise my new beautiful child, and I was thinking about how I can best educate her and my other children about values, morals, and other key thoughts about life. School offers education. Religion offers some values and morals. Parents offer most of it, sometimes intentionally, sometimes accidentally.

So I created a (WTLB) book, like a dictionary, which lists things like honesty, love, persistence, etc. with a definition that I created, with my wife’s input. I then turned it into a workbook with one word per page and space below for notes. For years we would discuss with my two daughters and they would draw pictures and make notes in the blank space. I may share some of those images with you. As they got older, they were less inclined to draw and more open to quotes and references from adults, hence where Frey Freyday came from….

You can read more at www.onewebstrategy.com

 

Bonus: 7 Great TED talks about Compassion

https://www.ted.com/playlists/447/how_to_make_compassion_thrive

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